Dungeness Schoolhouse

If you are in the area during Lavender Weekend, you might want to check the Dungeness Schoolhouse. It’s nearby to the farms and festivities in the Sequim-Dungeness area. The schoolhouse is part of the local history. In the early days, the Dungeness area was a thriving community and early settlers saw the need for a school. At a meeting on May 10, 1892, votes were cast in favor of bonding the Dungeness District for $3,000 to buy land which was then cleared and fenced; a two-story schoolhouse was built and furnished on the property. You’ll find the schoolhouse off East Anderson Road near the Dungeness River.

On February 27, 1893, the Dungeness School opened with 73 pupils ranging in age from 5 to 20 years. The teacher received $75 a month for a four-month term, ending June 30; living quarters were provided on the second floor. Classes were large and books and supplies were not easy to acquire. School Board minutes from April 8, 1895, show a motion was passed to buy the school a bottle of ink. The photo on the left is from 1893. One can only imagine what it was like to hear the bell ring to call students from throughout the area.

And, to know that there were no cell phones or tablets or computers or video games to distract learning.

 

Today the schoolhouse is still used for classes and programs and can be rented for special events.  The  main classroom area will hold about 30 people. Upstairs is the auditorium with a stage and room for about 90. One modern addition, besides the indoor plumbing and new electrical is the addition of an elevator!

Stop by this historic gem and take a step back in time. Hear the bell ring calling you to class?

Travel the Olympic Peninsula w/o a Car

Yes, travel to the Olympic Peninsula without a car can be done

Travel to the Olympic Peninsula without a car can be a challenge, but it can be done. There are many resources to help you plan your visit sans automobile. We hope this blog post will inspire you plan and navigate your way around with a bicycle or on foot. If you are bicycling, check out the Olympic Discovery Trail for transportation corridors across the peninsula.

If you are arriving at SEATAC Airport, Seattle, The Dungeness Line or Rocket Transportation shuttles are easy to find at the south end of the airport. The Dungeness Line has a scheduled route, while Rocket Transportation will deliver you to your specified destination.

Links to local websitesto connect around the Olympic Peninsula:

  • Clallam Transit Bus. Contact the Clallam Transit center directly for questions about their routes and prices 800-858-3747.  Keep in mind, also, that you can rack a bicycle on the Clallam Transit buses for free on a  first-come first-served space.
  • Mason County Transit Authority. All MTA buses are equipped with bike racks to carry two or three conventional single seat, two-wheeled bicycles.
  • Jefferson TransitThis website has a page with a listing of other auto-less transportation options for the entire area – Seattle, Victoria, Kitsap, Whidbey Island. A useful resource!
  • Grays Harbor Transit
  • Another option is hiring a private tour guide to take you anywhere you want to go.  Here is a link with a list of them.

If you are based in Port Angeles, you’ll find these bus lines with some suggestions of things to see and how to get there.

pt erider a new way to travel in Port Townsend

PTe-rider – a new way to travel in Port Townsend

#30 Port Angeles to Sequim. Once you’re in Sequim you can schedule a Dial-a-Ride to take you out to the Dungeness Rec Area where there is camping and hiking.  This needs to be scheduled 24 hours in advance.
From Sequim to Port Townsend
take the Jefferson Transit #8 bus.  There is a cool new way to explore this charming, Victorian seaport. It’s the PTe-rider. Hop aboard the first electric shuttle service in Washington State. Open April through October, they offer taxi service tours of Port Townsend’s historic districts.

#10 Port Angeles to Joyce on Hwy 112 will drop you off at Camp Hayden Rd. which is about 4 miles south of Salt Creek Recreation Area. It would be a hike to get to Salt Creek, but if it’s low tide and you are a tidepooler, it might be worth it. Even if you don’t want to go as far as Salt Creek, I’d recommend the blackberry pie at the Blackberry Cafe – also the jalapeno burger if it’s still on the menu. Two must dos are the Joyce General Store and the Joyce Museum. Words can’t adequately explain – it’s part history, part now. Start by talking to Margaret at the museum. She can tell you the historical details, local lore and guide you through the museum that used to be the old railroad station.

#20 Port Angeles to the Olympic National Park Visitor Information Center where passes and permits can be bought.  This route will drop you off a couple blocks down the hill from the Visitor Information Center. You would need to hire a vehicle to take you up the mountain, either taxi or guide. Here’s a link to guide services.  Green 8 Taxi Service.  Black Tie Taxi Service.

Travel Lake-C-fall-pano-lo.jpg

Lake Crescent

#14 Port Angeles along Hwy 101 around Lake Crescent.  Stopping here at Lake Crescent you can hike to Marymere Falls and into the backcountry. A visit to Lake Crescent Lodge is an historical treat. Sit on the sun porch with cool drink in hand, relaxing in wicker chairs and watching the kayakers and swimmers. This route will also take you to Forks, if you ever want to travel from its serene shores.

Travel Camping on Second Beach

Second Beach

#15 Forks to La Push.  At La Push are the hikes to Second Beach and Third Beach, both great for setting up a tent and falling asleep to the sound of the waves. These beaches are located in the National Park and so camping permits to stay overnight need to be obtained from the Visitor Center in Port Angeles.  There are no amenities or camping sites on these beaches and everything must be packed in and packed back out.

Forks south to Lake Quinault. Jefferson Travel from Forks (Forks Transfer Center is located at 552 S Forks Ave & E Street) can take you south to Lake Quinault area, stopping at Lower Hoh, Kalaloch, Queets and then to Amanda Park Mercantile at the lake. From Amanda Park you can transfer to Grays Harbor Transit, which will require a separate fare and exact change.

#16 Port Angeles to Neah Bay.  The Makah Reservation has its own bus system once the Clallam County system drops you off.  There is a bus that will take you to the Cape Flattery Trail but contact this bus system directly to make sure.  Cape Flattery is the most NW point of the contiguous United States. There are views of Tattoosh Island and lighthouse along with excellent wildlife viewing. If the whales aren’t around, the birds will be. There is no service of this bus system on Saturdays, Sundays, or Holidays. Be sure to visit the Makah Cultural and Resource Center. It’s a world-class museum with artifacts and displays highlighting the history and culture of this part of the world.

Travel to Victoria, Canada – Bring your passport!

The side trip popular with many visitors is to travel to Victoria, BC, Canada, is a simple, 90-minutes, walk-on ride on the Coho Ferry. The ferry docks in the beautiful inner harbor across the street from the Parliament Building. Make your visit a “two-nation vacation”! If you are bringing your bike or would just like to have a lovely walk, put the Galloping Goose Trail from Victoria to Sooke on your itinerary. Here are some photos from their website.

Have fun and travel safely!

Olympic Peninsula Park Passes Made Simple

Some parks and trailheads around the peninsula require a pass. Generally, you can purchase passes at each entrance to each kind of park.

ONP annual passEach national park has its own pass. For example, you could buy an annual pass to Mt. Rainer OR Olympic National Park. This year these cost $50 each. Weekly admissions to the parks are sold at the entrances or Visitor Centers for $20 (going up to $25 on June 1, 2016). Only four entrances require a pass: Hurricane Ridge, Sol Duc, Staircase and Hoh Rain Forest. You can either pay as you enter these entrances or stop at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles to purchase the pass.
America the Beautiful Pass is an interagency pass good for all Federal lands – National Parks, National Forest, monuments, etc. This costs $80 for an annual pass.

If you plan on bicycling or walking in, it’s only $7/person. Learn more here, or check with the park 360-565-3130. Some of the info on their site is outdated. But you will be able to see the different types of passes:

  • Private vehicle
  • Motorcycle
  • Per person
  • Wilderness camping fees
  • Campground fees
  • Commercial tours
  • Non-commercial groups
  • Dump station fees

There is the equivalent to the interagency pass for active military – one year is free with documentation. These are only dispensed by rangers.
There is the equivalent of the interagency pass for seniors (62+) or disabled people. This is a lifetime pass that costs $10 and is sold only by rangers to people with proof of eligibility.

discover pass logoWashington State Parks, like Fort Worden require a Discover Pass which you can learn about here. If you click here you can see the State Parks By Region which will tell you which parks require which pass. Last time I went to Fort Worden, I just paid at the entrance kiosk by the parking lot. But if you wish to purchase the Discover pass ahead of time you can do there online hereDiscover annual passes ($35 from vendors/$30 if you purchase them at the same time you pay your car license renewals or from a ranger at the park) are for the Washington State parks.  Discover day passes cost $10 ($12 from vendors) and are good for State parks for one day only.  These can be purchased in advance or at the park.

Similarly, there is Olympic National Forest (ONF) that offers miles of hiking trails in the woods has a different set of passesForest Service pass. Here is a list of trails that are on ONF land that require an Olympic National Forest pass (different from an Olympic National Park pass). A lot of these spectacular trails are on the east side of the peninsula with access from Hwy 101 along Hood Canal, except for the  Quinault Rain Forest trails, which are in the southwest area of the peninsula. Some, by by no means all of the National Forest trails, require either an annual pass or a day pass for parking. Day passes cost $5. Passes are not sold a the trail heads, so they must be purchased in advance. An annual pass for the National Forests in Washington and Oregon only (no parks and no other state’s national forests) costs $30. Print a pass for the ONF on your computer before you come! $5.00

horizontal Hobuck Beach

Hobuck Beach, Neah Bay

If you are headed to Shi Shi Beach, Cape Flattery or other spots in Neah Bay on the Makah Reservation, the Makah Tribe requires visitors to have a $10 Recreation Pass. The Recreational Use Permit (RUP) is available for sale at the Makah Museum, Washburn’s Store and at the Makah Tribal Center at a cost of $10.00 per car and is good for the calendar year in which it is purchased. The permit is required if you are going to engage in recreational activities on the Reservation – hiking, camping, kayaking, sports-fishing, etc.

Dungeness Lighthouse

Dungeness Lighthouse

Also, there is a small fee at the trailhead of $3 per family or per group (up to four adults) at the Dungeness Wildlife Refuge. Children under 16 enter free. Refuge Annual Pass, Federal Recreational Lands Pass, Senior or Golden Age Pass, Access or Golden Access Pass, Military Pass, Volunteer Pass, and a Federal Duck Stamp also admit family or group (up to 4 adults). One of the special things to do in this area is hiking on the Dungeness Spit to the lighthouse at the end of the sandy spit.

Port Angeles Kayak & Film Festival – April 22 – 24

PA Kayak & Film Festival If you are not in the market to purchase a kayak, but are in the market for a great weekend, try the Port Angeles Kayak and Film Festival this weekend. What’s better than spending a couple days trying out some different kayaks, learning something new at one of the seminars, or trying out boats on the water? Maybe watching amazing kayak films or joining the new kayak yoga group by the water or maybe just hanging out by the water?  In the past it’s been a blast regardless of the weather and this year, 2016, looks like it should be good again. Maybe a few light sprinkles, but that never lays a wet blanket on us at this event. We’re probably already wet from playing in the water!

There is still time to sign up for a New Course- Yoga for Paddlers. Kathleen Grimblyyoga on the beach will focus on stretches specifically for range of motion for forward, reverse and sweep strokes. Course will start on the beach, then move into the boats on beach, then progress to boats in the water.
Yoga is on Saturday April 23rd, 11:00- Noon, at Hollywood Beach downtown Port Angeles.
Sign Up: www.portangeleskayakandfilm.com or call (360) 417-3015.

Friday night at Barhop Brewery, 5 – 7 pm – preregistration. We highly recommend taking advantage of pre-registration so you are not rushed for your classes on Saturday.  Please note, because a release form is required you must register in person. Besides, there will be some good brew and pizza and three videos to watch with all the other paddlers. Of course during the day Saturday, you’ll want to be with us in the boats at Hollywood Beach in front of the Red Lion Hotel. Do you prefer a sit-on-top, fishing, inflatable or recreational style best?

kayak festivalSaturday Evening Main Event is a presentation at Peninsula College Maier Performance Hall at 7pm by award-winning filmmaker and adventurer, Justine Curgenven of Cackle TV Productions.

Here’s a list of some of her adventures:

  • The first all-female circumnavigation of Tasmania –  900-miles in 42 days.
  • A solo trip around Iceland’s West Fjords
  • A 400mile journey up the Pacific coast of Kamchatka with Hadas Feldman and a novice Russian sea kayaker.
  • A 500mile circumnavigation of the Queen Charlotte Islands with Shawna Franklin & Leon Somme
  • A kayak crossing of the treacherous Bass Strait, between mainland Australia and Tasmania
  • The first kayak circumnavigation of wales ( by sea, river and canal) with Fiona Whitehead
  • A 2400km circumnavigation of the South island of New Zealand taking 67 days, with Barry Shaw
  • A 500 mile circumnavigation of Sardinia with Barry Shaw
  • 3 crossings of the Irish Sea of between 45-57 nautical miles – from Anglesey to the Isle of Man, from the Llyn Peninsula to Wicklow in Ireland and from Holyhead to Dublin. All the crossings were done in strong following ( or side) winds. The Llyn- Wicklow Crossing was on New Years Day, one of the shortest ( and coldest) days of the year.
  • A crossing from mainland Scotland to Shetland, via the Orkney islands and Fair Isle
  • Kayaking 120 miles from London to France in 50 hours & kayaking from Russia to Japan in a series of open water crossings – both with Sarah Outen.
  • With Barry Shaw, becoming the first people to kayak 1000 miles around ‘Isla Grande’, Tierra Del Fuego – a remote windswept Patagonian island.
  • Kayaking from England to France, & from Russia to Japan with Sarah Outen. See the film on ‘This is the Sea 5′
  • Circumnavigation of Ireland in 2013 with Barry Shaw & Roger Chandler
  • Kayaking 2500 km along the Aleutian island chain and Alaskan peninsula with Sarah Outen in 2014

Here’s the link to all the other stuff going on over the weekend. Even if you don’t kayak, the speakers and films should be outstanding , and the beer cold. See you around the boats this weekend.

Washington Coast Cleanup

clean up crew

Thank You Coast Savers Crew

Washington Coast Cleanup: Registration Now Open!  The Washington Coast Cleanup will be on Saturday, April 23rd. Online registration is now open at www.coastsavers.org. Join us for the largest beach cleanup effort in the state! Invite your friends and family and make a weekend out of it among old friends or new. There are some awesome BBQs and special events being provided by our partners that weekend. Check out the list below. Last year, over 1,500 volunteers removed at least 19 tons of debris from almost 50 beaches. This year could be even bigger with all the debris that’s washed in with the winter storms.

BBQ’S & SPECIAL EVENTS FOR COASTSAVERS

Friday, April 22

Saturday, April 23

  • Soup Feed at Moose Lodge in Ocean Park, noon – 1:30 p.m.
  • Surfrider BBQ at Twin Harbors State Park, noon – 1 p.m.
  • Washington State Parks Ranger Association BBQ at Griffiths-Priday State Park, noon – 1:30 p.m.
  • (CoastSavers Fundraiser) Seafood Boil, Mill 109 Restaurant, Seabrook, noon – 2 p.m.
  • Kalaloch Lodge BBQ, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Surfrider BBQ at Three Rivers Fire Station, 11:30 a.m. – 3
  • Friends of Olympic National Park, Refreshments at Lake Ozette Registration Station
  • The Lost Resort at Ozette serves up Rob’s famous 15-bean soup, noon – 2 p.m.
  • Surfrider BBQ at Hobuck Beach Campground, noon – 2 p.m.
  • Chito Beach Resort, 1 – 4 p.m.
  • Port Townsend Coop, $5 in store credit for volunteers
  • River and Ocean Film Festival, Rainforest Arts Center in Forks, 7 p.m.

If you haven’t participated in a cleanup in a while, now is the time. We need your help and the beach needs your help. And, if you have never participated, DO IT! It’s a blast and a great thing for our beaches. Be among your peeps! You’ll feel good getting the beaches ready for the season of camping, tidepooling and strolling the clean beach!

To the beach, for the beach!

6 Travel Tips for this Spring

Here are six travel tips from a native Olympic Peninsula-ite, who thinks that winter and spring are special times to enjoy the outdoors here. Yes, of course, it can rain, but good gear will negate any reasons to not get out there to enjoy the lush greens and fresh air. You can find exquisite glimpses of nature that only happen at this time of year. There is a quiet solitude on most trails and the beaches entertain the changing weather. Late winter, early spring are good times to come visit. Whether you storm watch or shred the ski slopes, you’ll find yourself renewed.

Marymere Falls near Lake Crescent in Winter

Marymere Falls near Lake Crescent in Winter

  1. TRAVEL TIP #1.  Do some research before you come. If you aren’t one to make reservations ahead, at least check to see if there are activities that may limit hotel availability so you will be prepared. Be sure places you want to go are open and accessible on the days you plan to come. For example, at this time, the Hurricane Ridge Road is open Friday – Sunday. And it depends on the weather. Have a back up plan to find snow if the ‘Ridge road is closed and that’s your destination. Don’t over plan. Give yourself time to enjoy being here. The Olympic Peninsula Travel Planner can help with ideas. OlympicPeninsula.org. PS. If you are bringing your dog, be sure check out the Dog-Friendly Map info from another blog.
  2. TRAVEL TIP #2. Plan your visit by drive times, not by miles. Drive times and distance don’t always make sense. For example, if you are planning to drive directly to Neah Bay from Seattle it is only 154 miles, but it takes about 4-1/4 hours to get there. Magnificent scenery along the way, but no freeways. From Port Angeles to Forks, it is 56 miles and takes about 1-1/4 hours. These times are dependent on traffic and weather conditions. Give yourself plenty of time to enjoy the journey. Please obey the speed limit. There are multiple law enforcement agencies that will be watching!
  3. TRAVEL TIP #3. Pack for wearing layers and bring some rain gear. That’s an all-season recommendation for the Olympic Peninsula. You can drive from a sunny Blue Hole in Sequim to the damp, wet rain forest. Some tennis shoes are good for hiking on slick boardwalks and sturdy hiking boots are good for trails if they are muddy. I’ve seen flip-flops on the beach in the winter and wondered if the people hadn’t packed correctly, if they were trying to be one with the Pacific Ocean, or if they were just teenagers. I’m pretty sure their feet were cold no matter their reasons!
  4. TRAVEL TIP #4. Budget accordingly. Ferry (if you take one), gas, food, lodging, park permits, attraction fees and souvenirs. The Olympic Peninsula is abundant with things to do for free and low cost. Check out a previous blog for some free suggestions.
  5. TRAVEL TIP #5. Check out what the locals are doing. The communities around the peninsula are little jewels to explore. Take a look at the local papers, or bulletin boards at grocery stores or shop windows. Join the people who live here to see what they support in their communities. You can find everything from gem shows, to yoga retreats, to baking classes, to fly tying workshops, to “you-name-it” gatherings, to great local theater.
  6. TRAVEL TIP #6. Be realistic. I guess this is the biggest tip – to be realistic. Have an idea what you’d like to do, but remember all the variables. Weather, distance being the two main ones. Don’t try to do too much. Come and visit multiple times. Enjoy what you can do while you are here. Maybe one trip is only to go to Sol Duc Hot Springs and see one waterfall there. Maybe the next time you’ll go to the beach and stay, checking out a couple nearby beaches. The next time, maybe you will only camp at the Hoh Rainforest and do the hikes from the campground and take a raft trip down the river. You couldn’t do all of those itineraries in one weekend. Well, I guess you could, but you’d need some R&R when you got home!

Enjoy your visit. Relax, play, and let the nature of the Olympic Peninsula soak into you.

Hummingbirds in the winter? Yes!

Anna's hummingbirdIf you are a birder, young or old, you’ll add to your life list on the Olympic Peninsula. I’m interested in them, but I’m not a birder – YET. I know that this area almost always leads Washington State in high counts of species during spring migration. The Christmas bird count a big annual event for the Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park along the Olympic Peninsula Discovery Trail. The reason for my investigation?  I’ve noticed hummers hanging around my house for the last few days. My curiosity was up. So I started some research about these lovely little guys that chose to stay here in the winter. Boy, was I surprised.     In looking for bird information, I found listings for over 350 species that visit the Olympic Peninsula.

We have three different types of hummers. Anna’s, Calliope and Rufous Hummingbirds all have been reported. Maybe on examination, I think I know which one I saw.

Anna’s like to live in the forests, brush areas and in town. It is a permanent resident along the West Coast from British Columbia to northern Mexico.

Calliope’s like to live in the forests and have only been seen on the Olympic Peninsula a few times. They are the smallest – about three inches long. (The ones I saw seemed more robust!)

That leaves the Rufous hummingbirds. They live in forest, brush areas and in town. They are rarely seen in the winter. They are common in the spring and early summer, and fairly common in the fall.

So I probably am not seeing Calliope’s or Rufous. But, I want more information. An email to my birder friend says that Anna’s should be the only ones hanging around at this time of year. According to ebird.org, there was a registered siting in Neah Bay on February 1. And, Anna’s have been seen on Ediz Hook in Port Angeles within the last couple weeks. Conclusion: Anna’s Hummingbirds are at my house!

All this is fascinating to me. Think how far birds travel during their life times. Much farther than many of us do over the course of our life times. This graphic from Cornell Labs totally mesmerized me. Be sure to watch the animated migration.

Watch the animated version to see how far birds actually travel

Watch the animated version to see how far birds actually travel

Winter in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Olympic Coast Marine Sanctuary photo - Winter Storm

Olympic Coast Marine Sanctuary photo

A winter visit to Washington’s Olympic Coast provides opportunities for a unique and
rewarding experience. You will likely encounter few visitors, giving you an even greater
appreciation for the remote wilderness of our rugged coastline. Winter storms create fascinating wave-watching conditions, with wind, rain and high tides yielding dramatic scenes of waves crashing against the rocky shores, as well as the numerous seastacks dotting the nearshore environment. Dress for the weather and make it a memorable day reveling in one of nature’s best winter wonders.

The winter is also a popular time for marine debris to wash up on shore. This is the perfect time for beach combing. If you feel like doing something wonderful for the environment, bring gloves and disposable bags to collect trash from the pristine environment you are enjoying and help keep our beaches clean and our marine organisms safe. You may even be rewarded by finding a rare item while beach combing – such as a prized glass float.

Particularly high, or “King Tides”, during this period take place on the following dates (based on

 December 23 high tide of 9.71 ft at 10:07am
 December 24 high tide of 9.84 ft at 10:55am
 December 25 high tide of 9.81 ft at 11:41am
 December 26 high tide of 9.59 ft at 12:25pm
 January 9 high tide of 9.2 ft at 11:24am
 January 10 high tide of 9.37 ft at 12:06pm
 January 11 high tide of 9.37 ft at 12:48pm
 January 21 high tide of 9.16 ft at 9:54am
 January 22 high tide of 9.27 ft at 10:45am
 January 23 high tide of 9.28 ft at 11:31am
 January 24 high tide of 9.17 ft at 12:14pm

For more information and locations of King Tides, visit:

Tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov

Remember to stay safe while enjoying the moody beauty of our Olympic Coast!

For more information about Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, visit:
OlympicCoast.noaa.gov
Facebook at www.facebook.com/usolympiccoastgov/

Twitter at Twitter.com/OlympicCoast

Thanks to Karlyn Langjahr, guest Blogger:  Olympic Coast Discovery Center Manager

Adventure Travelers Winter Itinerary #101 for the OP

snowboarders2010 agreementAdventure Travelers Winter Itinerary #101 for Washington’s Olympic Peninsula

Winter activities on the Olympic Peninsula are pretty much the same as what you can do during any other time of the year – just with different attire! Hiking, kayaking, surfing, biking.

Two-day Adventure on the Olympic Peninsula

Arrival Evening in Port Angeles or surrounding area

Go for a run or bike ride along the Olympic Discovery Trail. Be sure to put your lights on!

Day 1 ~ Hurricane Ridge – Get up early and head to Hurricane Ridge for some outdoor altitude play!

 A 45-minute drive takes you into the Olympic Mountains. The road is scheduled to be open Fridays through Sundays and Monday holidays through the end of March, weather permitting. Depending on the weather, it will also be open December 26 to January 3. If the parking lot gets too full, the road may close temporarily, so an early start is good thing! Sitting atop an alpine meadow is the day lodge and observation point. From here you have many choices whether there is snow or no snow! No snow? Wander along the trails and stop at great spots for photo opportunities. Snow? Skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoe, snow board! Carrying chains in the car is mandatory during the winter.

Take the Ranger-led snowshoe walk that is about a mile and takes about 90 minutes. Learn lots and see the area in a new way. Sign up at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center when you get there. These walks fill up fast. Minimal cost of $7.00 for adults. $3 for children 6 – 15. Free for children 5 and younger. Scope out places to take your cross-country daring-do. Here’s the scoop for Hurricane Ridge.

Hurricane Ridge Visitors Center

Wilderness Information Center

Olympic National Park

http://www.nps.gov/olym/

3002 Mount Angeles Road

Port Angeles, WA 98362

360-565-3130

Day 2 ~ Kayaking the the Morning  – Depart for Lake Crescent area

A deep, clear 12-mile long lake in the Olympic National Park, 17 miles west of Port Angeles along Hwy 101. There are several spot to launch: Fairholm at the far west end, public boat launch at Barnes Point or in front of Lake Crescent Lodge. Other nooks and launch areas can be found. Enjoy the gorgeousness of this special place. Short paddle, long paddle, your choice. Be aware that the weather can change very rapidly on the lake and the wind usually starts to gather steam at noon.

Feel like a short hike to loosen up the legs after sitting in the kayak? Trail options around the Barnes Point area are:  the Moments in Time or Marymere Falls.  The hike to Mount Storm King is longer and difficult but well worth the steep climb. Be REALLY careful in the winter when the ground is slippery. The cliffs are non-forgiving. If it is snowy or icy, save it for summer!

Moments in Time Nature Trail is approximately a ½-mile loop trail and offers nice views of the lake and winds through old-growth forest and former homestead sites. It is located between Nature Bridge and Lake Crescent Lodge. A 1/3-mile trail extends from Storm King Ranger Station parking lot.

Marymere Falls is a spectacular 90′ waterfall just one mile from Lake Crescent. The trail leads through old growth forest with flowering plants and mushrooms in season. If it’s snowing or freezing cold the waterfall becomes fairyland like you’ve never seen. Totally worth the hike, but be really careful crossing the bridge and along the switchbacks.

Across the lake near the headwaters of the Lyre River you’ll find the Spruce Railroad Trail that is also part of the Olympic Discovery Trail. The Spruce Railroad Trail connects the North Shore of Lake Crescent and Lyre River trailheads. Much of this relatively flat 4-mile trail runs on or adjacent to the World War I Spruce Railway bed and offers excellent Lake Crescent views.

Have a safe, warm, adventurous time!

Romantic/Foodie Travelers Winter Itinerary #214

Finnriver stop along the Red Wine and Chocolate Tour

Finnriver stop along the Red Wine and Chocolate Tour

Romantic/Foodie Travelers Winter Itinerary #214 for Washington’s Olympic Peninsula

Comfort food and wine tasting at its best. Take your Valentine wine tasting, stay in a cozy B&B or lodge, and taste exquisite food along the Olympic Culinary Loop.

Red Wine & Chocolate Winery Tour
February 13, 14, 15 & 20, 21, 2016
11:00am – 5:00pm
21 and older for wine tasting 

Taste your way along a leisurely romantic drive through the scenic Olympic Peninsula. The Olympic Peninsula Red Wine and Chocolate Tour is one we wait for every year. The tour travels around the peninsula so it is good to have a designated driver. We split the driving by one person driving the Port Angeles/Sequim area one day and another person driving the Port Townsend area the next day. The next tour (NW Wine and Cheese Tour in May!) we switch drivers so each driver gets to taste in both areas.

An online ticket is $40 and gets you a commemorative wine glass, complimentary wine tasting and chocolate samples at all TEN wineries on the tour. Tickets sold at the wineries are $45. Tickets are not required to attend. A $7 wine tasting fee will be charged at each winery for non-ticketed visitors.

Visit www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org for further information.

Each of the wineries will pair their special wines with yummy, decadent chocolate offerings and other tasty treats.

Olympic Peninsula Wineries on the Tour

Finnriver Farm and Cidery. Tarts baked in the wood fire oven. Variety of adult “cocktails”
Address: 142 Barn Swallow Rd, Chimacum, WA 98325
Phone: (360) 732-4337

Marrowstone Vineyards. Dark chocolates, white chocolates and caramels with new wine releases
Address: 423 Meade Rd, Nordland, WA 98358
Phone: (360) 385-9608

Lullaby Winery – New Tour Destination. Artisan chocolates from France and Walla Walla paired with four handpicked wines
Address: 274 Otto St, Port Townsend, WA 98368
Phone: (509) 386-1324

FairWinds Winery. They will have their chocolate fountain again this year!
Address: 1984 Hastings Ave W, Port Townsend, WA 98368
Phone: (360) 385-6899

Eaglemount Wine & Cider. Quince mead, Dandelion wine, local chocolate, hors-d’oeuvres
Address: 1893 S Jacob Miller Rd, Port Townsend, WA 98368
Phone: (360) 732-4084

Wind Rose Cellars. Yvonne’s Chocolates, new releases of 2013 Dolcetto and 2012 Bravo Rosso, live music Feb. 7, Feb 13 and 14
Address: 143 W Washington St, Sequim, WA 98382
Phone: (360) 681-0690

Olympic Cellars. Morphs into late 19th century Moulin Rouge. New releases. And 2009 Merlot and 2009 Syrah, both gold medal winners!
Address: 255410 US-101, Port Angeles, WA 98362
Phone: (360) 452-0160

Camaraderie Cellars.  Quadra, red wine blend is new to the tasting. Pulled pork with cocoa-spiced rub cooked in the winery’s wood fire oven
Address: 334 Benson Rd, Port Angeles, WA 98363
Phone: (360) 417-3564

Harbinger Winery. We Do Fudge from Sequim will be there….need we say more? Dark Chocolate Sea Salt and Caramel paired with Dynamo Red? Says it all!
Address: 2358 Highway 101 West, US-101, Port Angeles, WA 98363
Phone: (360) 452-4262

Any number of lovely B&Bs will add to the romance and keep you close to the winery tour trail. Check on the Inns of Excellence for ideas. InnsofExcellence.com

Also, check the Olympic Culinary Loop for dining ideas. You’ll find the cuisine of the Olympic Peninsula in establishments from casual to white linen napkins.  OlympicPeninsulaCulinaryLoop.com