Author Archives: Mary

The 10th Annual, 61-mile Great Strait Garage Sale & Birthday Party

September 8 - 10. Get ready for a long garage sale - plus a birthday party? Help celebrate 10 years of bringing this event to the public. So much fun. Here's a milepost by milepost rundown of some of the fun ahead on Hwy 112. And, if you can't make it this year, put it on the calendar for next year. It's local fun at its best. It just keeps getting bigger and better.
  • Advertised Sales … East to West by Mileposts (mp) Watch for other sales signed on the road that are not advertised here.
  • Oxenford Farm Garage Sale … 676 Oxenford Road located between mp 57/56. Fall clean up on the farm with something for everyone. Produce, jellies, apple and berry pies, baked goods, quilts and bags, exercise equipment, misc. household and furniture items.
  • Multi-Family Garage Sale … 81 Hart Road (off Freshwater Bay Road, up 9/10 mi. turn left) mp 57/56 Tools, fishing gear, truck, saddles and horse tack, household, washer/dryer … LOTS of everything!
  • Fire Department Community Appreciation Open House…51250 Hwy 112 between mp 52/51 Just east of Joyce General Store. Check out our yard sale from 11am-3pm. Stop by for a free hot dog and water, and meet some of our volunteer firefighters and our commissioners.
  • JOYCE COMMUNITY SITE … At Joyce Depot Museum mp 51 Drawing for a give-away “birthday” cake to celebrate the 10 th Great Strait Sale
  • Plant sale … Joyce Community Site … Joyce Depot Museum mp 51 Young, unusual geraniums for your indoor winter pleasure. Assorted succulents. Organic tomatoes. Oma’s Acres. Gertie Rohrbach
  • Half-Corked Coasters Garage Sale … at Joyce Community Site, Joyce Depot Museum … mp 51 Handmade coasters! Large selection of styles and designs including Seahawks, WSU, UW, Olympic National Park, Port Angeles, Lavender … and many more to choose from!
  • Family Kitchen in Joyce … across from the Joyce General Store … mp 51/50 Mention this ad and get $1.00 off any entrée … Saturday, September 9 th only.
  • Crescent Grange Parking Lot Sale in Joyce mp 51/50 Furniture including tables, chairs, cabinets and recliner.  Also vacuum cleaners, light fixtures, pictures, books and movies. Proceeds help support youth scholarships and grange activities.
  • Big 5-Family Garage Sale … 92 Gossett Road (Whiskey Creek area) between mp 49-48 Antiques. Garden art. Furniture 1st-class and 2nd-hand items. Knick knacks. Lots of junktiques … and other neat stuff!
  • CLALLAM BAY/SEKIU COMMUNITY SITE … Clallam Bay Visitor Center mp 17/16 Music from 11am on into afternoon … Mary&Barney (Bluegrass) and Buddy Cloy (variety)
  • Strait Shots Espresso … 17295 Hwy 112, east entrance to Clallam Bay, between mp 18/17 The “Only Drive Thru Espresso” on beautiful Strait of Juan de Fuca Scenic Byway 112. Now serving Burgers, Hot Dogs, Chili Dogs.  $1 off any drink or meal with mention of the “Great Strait Sale!” Huge moving sale and other sales at this location as well!
  • Unique Junque … 16795 Hwy 112, next to Sunsets West Co-op, between mp 17/16 “Fun Days Fireworks” rummage sale! “Goodities and Oddities” too numerous to mention!
  • Sunsets West Co-Op … 16795 Hwy 112 … in “downtown” Clallam Bay between mp 17/16 Mention the Great Strait Sale and get $1 off a $4 "soup of the day".  We have ice cream and fun local goodies. Fresh local produce and a fine place to rest during your day of treasure hunting. See you at the sale.
  • Lions Club and others … 5th and Bogachiel in Clallam Bay mp 17/16 Lots of miscellaneous … and furniture, too … at old Fire Hall next to Lions Club. Check us out, could be some good finds for the right person in this big sale … even “GUY” stuff!
  • Three Sisters of Clallam … 16590 Hwy 112 in Clallam Bay mp 17-16 Big green building in Clallam Bay … lots of great buys and bargains!
  • Collectibles and More … 16732 Hwy 112 (across from Visitor Center) … mp 17/16 Collectibles: pottery, china, costume jewelry. Gently used and new clothing. Prom dresses. Household items. 60’s playpen. Lots of items (more than just a garage sale).
  • Breakwater Inn … Middle Point between Clallam Bay and Sekiu on Hwy 112 … mp 16/15 Breakfast ~ Lunch ~ Dinner. “Home of the Breakwater Sandwich” … 5% off meal with mention of the “Great Strait Sale” … Saturday only.
  • NEAH BAY COMMUNITY SITE … Village Market (by Washburn’s store) in Neah Bay Ask here for information about and location of individual sales in the community.
This event sponsored by the Juan de Fuca Scenic Byway Association, a non-profit org.  P.O. Box 188, Joyce, WA 98343 www.highway112.org  Contact: sandrabalch@olypen.com

Spend the night to enjoy the area: Take note of the Vietnam War Veteran’s and Korean War Veteran’s Memorial Highway designations and visit the Neah Bay Veteran’s Park Visit the Depot Museum in Joyce and the Makah Museum in Neah Bay Visit the Clallam County Parks at Clallam Bay, Pillar Point, Freshwater Bay and Salt Creek Recreation Area

Have fun. Drive Carefully. And, find good treasures along the Scenic Byway to go with the memories of our beautiful Strait of Juan de Fuca and surrounding landscape.

Calling All Hiking, Biking & History Buffs

Olympic Discovery Trail Route Update

If you haven’t been on the ODT recently, or EVER, now’s the time to explore this rails-to-trails route from Port Townsend to La Push, WA. With almost 79 miles of the anticipated 130-mile trail, new segments recently have been completed. And, they are highlights of the trail.

 
Image result for olympic national park mcfee tunnel

The original railroad tunnel (right) and the Olympic Discovery Trail construction (left)

The Spruce Railroad Trail section around Lake Crescent was built in 1918 so Sitka spruce for the construction of World War I biplanes could easily be transported from the woods via the - Deep breath in! - Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. The war ended before the trees could be used, but the railroad still was used to transport logs until 1951. Once completed in 2019, the Spruce Railroad Trail will be a safe alternative to avoid the traffic hazards of U.S. Highway 101 around lake’s southern shore.

 

Walkers and dogs enjoy the new McFee Tunnel

Bicyclists emerging from the 450-foot tunnel

  SThe Spruce Railroad Trail half-mile trail segment leading to and through the century-old McFee Tunnel which was blasted during World War I on the north shore of Lake Crescent, reopened to users of the trail this summer, 2017.

 

Next year, crews will restore the trail west of the McFee Tunnel and rehabilitate the shorter Daley-Rankin Tunnel to the west.

 

There are completed sections of the Olympic Discovery Trail west of the Spruce Railroad Trail on Fairholme Hill and in the Sol Duc Valley. The entire length of the Spruce Railroad Trail is scheduled to be paved in 2019.

  Also completed on the Olympic Discovery Trail in mid-May this year was the reconstruction of the 210-foot-long bridge at Sequim Bay State Park. The new bridge was one of 15 state parks construction projects to remove fish barriers. The stream which now flows 50 feet below, has been returned to it's natural state and the return of salmon is anticipated in the coming years.

The new bridge allows for sweeping views of the stream below

 

Native vegetation and woody debris has been replaced in the stream

                    What else is new with the trail? The Olympic Discovery Trail just launched a new website with an interactive map to stay up-to-date on all the trail improvements. Check out the new interactive map and learn about local walking, running and biking groups to join. Learn about all the current and future projects and ways to get involved. Be sure to like and follow the trail's Facebook page and share your own photos! Events on and in-support of the trail happening this September: Sept 16: Great Olympic Adventure Trail (GOAT) Run Sept 23: The Big Hurt, 4-Leg Race Sept 23: 17th Annual Dungeness River Festival at Railroad Bridge Park

The new Dungeness Bridge Trestle which was completed March 2016 after storms collapsed part of the bridge in 2015.

Diary of a Lighthouse Keeper

New Dungeness LighthouseDiary of a Lighthouse Keeper #1

A week in January at the New Dungeness Lighthouse - An adventure and an honor

Six of us keepers left the lighthouse transfer station in Carlsborg, WA, about 6:45pm on a Friday night. Two 4-wheel-drive vehicles were stuffed with all our provisions and personal gear for the week. This was my first time as a keeper and not altogether sure what I had gotten myself into. Luckily, three in our group had been keepers before and I knew two of our crew. We were assured that although the drive to the lighthouse was going to be rough, bumpy, dark, and a little scarey, the drivers were experienced and would keep us safe.

I knew I was in good hands, but wondered if this was such a good idea - a week with three women I'd never met and probably a minimum of a six-hour walk for me to get "off the island". At this point, I was committed and it was one of the best decisions for a "vacation" I've ever had.

load and unload gear at the lighthouseWhen we arrived at the lighthouse the returning keepers had all their gear ready to be loaded into the trucks for their trip back to civilization. All of us scrambled to unload/load as rapidly as possible to ensure the trucks could get back on the beach during the low tide change. So, there were were, watching the red tail lights disappear down the beach. STRANDED! Or so it crossed my mind! Another slight moment of "what have I done?"

We had organized ourselves as three groups for planning purposes during the weeks before we left and for duty shifts at the lighthouse. My work rotation for the week was: cook, day off, lighthouse duty - Repeat! I at least knew what was expected from me.

Lighthouse RoomGiven all the boxes of food and luggage we had to carry in, and the good humor among all six of us, I knew: a. we would not starve and, b. we all seemed to be kindred spirits.

First order of business was to unpack the groceries and settle into our rooms. I had a charming room with a quilt on the bed and a desk upstairs facing the lighthouse. I didn't close the blinds the first night, nor any other night there. I wanted to see the light flash in my room on its rotation. Later that first night, we all sat around the living room, most of us knitting, and introduced ourselves with a little of who, what, when and how we all ended up on this adventure together. One person who knew us all and had made all our arrangements and facilitated communication among us prior to the trip.

I studied a bit about the lighthouse that first night. The property had been continuously occupied since 1857. It was the first lighthouse built on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. What an honor to be part of that tradition. Our Keeper's Quarters were built in 1904. The Coast Guard had lighthouse duty for a period of time until 1934. In 1934, electricity was brought to the property through a cable underwater across Dungeness Bay. In April 1980, New Dungeness Lighthouse welcomed Seaman First Class Jeni Burr, New Dungeness’ first woman Head Keeper.  So many dates and interesting changes to the property and much more to learn - tomorrow!

I slept like a baby in the new surroundings! More Day #2 at the Lighthouse in the next blog.

Whales, Whales and More Whales!

The Strait of Juan de Fuca has had extraordinary numbers of humpback whales and sightings of a rare-to-these-waters fin whale. Orcas are active and part of the viewing spectacular! Definitely, local attention has been focused on the waters and the whales. On a recent whale-watching tour out of Port Angeles, we saw the trifecta! All three species - humpbacks, fin and Orcas. It was an astounding feeling to have possibly two dozen humpbacks surrounding the boat, breaching, and spouting. With the engines off we could hear them nearby when they were spouting. The fin whale looked rather like a very large brown log floating in the water, until it moved! It was a huge animal. The fin is the second largest whale after the blue whale. The Orcas were feeding, so we missed their usual playful behavior. But, again with the engines off, the Captain lowered a microphone into the water. We heard them talking to one another. Phenomenal! Here's what the naturalist aboard the ship the day we went had to say about our viewings:

Humpbacks and Orcas and a Fin, Oh My!

Port Angeles Highlights: Dozens of Humpbacks L-Pod Resident Orcas "The" Fin Whale Mt. Baker What happens when you mix sunny skies, flat seas, snow-capped peaks, and three species of whale?  Just another great day at the office with Port Angeles Whale Watch! The visibility today was phenomenal providing views of both the Olympic mountain range and Mt. Baker of the North Cascades. The humpbacks were up first, with many of the dozens of whales we spotted yesterday still feeding in the area.  Notable individuals that could be identified included BCX0298 "Split Fin", BCX1068 "Split Fluke", BCX1193 "Zig Zag", and CS631, but there were many, many more whales spouting and fluking in the distance. We next got a call of possible killer whales to the northeast so decided to investigate.  Sure enough, we arrived to see several members of the Southern Resident L-Pod spread out foraging for salmon.  While many of the whales were quite scattered, mom L77 "Matia" and her 4-year old calf, L119 "Joy" stayed nearby for a while.  Because it was so calm today, we were able to turn off the engines and drop in the hydrophone to eavesdrop on an orca conversation of whistles and squeals! It was time to return home, but luckily the route took us right back through humpback territory for an encore presentation.  Much to our delight, however, we were treated to our third whale species of the day - the rare fin whale that's been in the area for the last week or two!  It doesn't get much better than that!  Check out some of the gorgeous photos from today: Erin
Port Angeles: PA Whale Watching, 360.293.4215, whales@islandadventurecruises.com Port Angeles Whale Watch Company is owned and operated by Island Adventures based out of Anacortes, WA. Island Adventures Whale Watching has been in business since 1992 and has carried hundreds of thousands of satisfied passengers.

Port Townsend:  Puget Sound Express,  360-385-5288. https://www.pugetsoundexpress.com/

Three generations of our family have helped visitors have life-changing experiences with some of the most majestic creatures on the planet. Puget Sound Express has been a family business for 31 years!

Whales

Whales

Humpbacks

Humpbacks

Whales in Strait of Juan de Fuca

Whales in Strait of Juan de Fuca

Hwy 112 Scenic Byway, Festivals and a Great Sale

Highway 112 Scenic Byway along the shores of the Strait of Juan de Fuca is a must drive for visitors to Washington's Olympic Peninsula. Recently a blog post by Road Trippers' "Roads and Rides - Your guide to the best drives, coolest cars, and all things motoring", covered a trip along this Scenic Byway to the special places of Neah Bay and Cape Flattery, the most NW point in the contiguous USA - and stops
Hwy 112 map

Hwy 112 map

along the way.  The blog has 14 gorgeous photos, a map and generally great descriptions and ideas for following HWY 112. Check out this cool video before heading out. It highlights some of the best of the best along Hwy 112. Two exciting activities coming up on the highway are: Joyce Blackberry Daze, Saturday, August 6 and the Great Strait Sale on Saturday, September 10.
Joyce Blackberry Daze

Joyce Blackberry Daze

Olympic National Park Entrances

Hwy 101 Scenic Byway map

Olympic Peninsula Hwy 101 Scenic Byway

From Hood Canal to Lake Quinault, follow the Highway 101 Scenic Byway to find several possibilities for entering the Olympic National Park. Each place offers different terrain, experiences, and chances to learn more about the park. PORT ANGELES - The primary Olympic National Park Visitor Center is open daily 8:30am - 5:00pm. General information, a children’s Discovery Room, bookshop, maps, exhibits and a near-by nature trail makes this a must stop while in Port Angeles. Be sure to take time to watch the movie. If it isn't running, just ask one of the rangers to start it. For park information call 360-565-3130. If all you want to check is the 24- hour recorded road and weather update, call 360-565-3131. If you need backpacking information or permits, or to acquire required bear cans for backcountry camping, check with the Wilderness Information Center (WIC) May 1 - June 11,  8am - 4:30pm daily June 12 - September 10, 8am - 5pm daily (until 6pm Friday, Saturday) September 11 - 30, 8am- 5pm daily.
Hurricane Hill walk from Hurricane Ridge

Hurricane Hill walk from Hurricane Ridge

HURRICANE RIDGE - The Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center is open daily 9:00am - 5:30pm with information, maps, exhibits, an orientation film, and nearby trails. The snack bar and gift shop are open daily 10:00am - 6:00pm. The information desk is staffed daily 10:00am - 5:30pm. Enjoy the Terrace Talk, daily 10:30am, 1:00pm, 4:00pm. Learn about this amazing wilderness park at a 20-minute talk. Topics vary. Join the easy one-hour guided walk to explore life in the mountains for a Meadow Walk, daily at 11:30am. and 2:00pm. Discover wildlife, wildflowers and other features of the Olympic landscape. HEART O’ THE HILLS - At Heart O’ the Hills Campground amphitheater, join others to enjoy the Evening Program,on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday at 8:00pm. Topics will be listed on bulletin boards. Junior Ranger Forest Activities are on Saturday at 10:00am for one hour of forest activities. Meet at the campground amphitheater.
Fall at Lake Crescent

Lake Crescent

LAKE CRESCENT - Storm King Ranger Station is open Wednesday - Saturday 11:00am - 4pm with information, activities for kids, and access to trails. Join the Marymere Falls Forest Walk on Fridays at 10:00am. Meet on the Lake Crescent Lodge porch for this easy, 1-1/2-hour guided hike. Got a younger one with you? How about them becoming an Olympic Junior Ranger? This program starts Saturdays 10:30am at Storm King Ranger Station. Join a ranger for an hour of hands-on activities. One of the highlights of summer in the park are the evening programs. Lake Crescent evening gatherings are on Tuesdays and Saturdays 7:30pm at Storm King. Learn more about the park after dark. Topics will be listed on bulletin boards at the Ranger Station. MORA - Beginning June 25, the Mora Ranger Station is open Friday - Monday 1:00 - 5:00pm for   information and maps. Bark Rangers - If you have a dog with you, you might want to show up on Saturdays, Sundays at 10am at the Rialto Beach Trailhead. Learn how to visit the park safely with your pet and earn a Bark Ranger Badge for your pup. There is also an Evening Program - Monday, Friday 8:00pm at the Mora Campground amphitheater. Topics will be listed on bulletin boards at the Ranger Station.
beach

Kalaloch Beach

KALALOCH - Kalaloch Ranger Station is open daily with information, exhibits, bookshop, and maps. Science on the Shore is held Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday Times and topics vary with changing tides. Explore the shore with a ranger in this hands-on program. Schedule and location information will be listed on bulletin boards. Vacation Volunteers can take a walk on the coast with a ranger and help leave this park better than you found it -  Saturdays 10:00am - noon.  Bark Rangers - Daily, 1:00 p.m. at  at Learn how to visit the park safely with your pet and earn a Bark Ranger Badge for your pup. Meet at the Kalaloch Lodge Gazebo, daily at 1:00pm.  The Evening Program is held on Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday at 8:00pm at the Kalaloch Campground amphitheater. Topics on bulletin boards. QUINAULT RAIN FOREST - Quinault Rain Forest Ranger Station on North Shore Road is open Thursday - Monday 9:00am - 5:00pm. It is closed for guided walks and lunch. You find information, exhibits, a bookshop, maps, and nearby trails. Life in the Rain Forest Walk is scheduled Thursday - Monday at 1:00pm. Learn about rain forest plants, animals and homesteader lore. Meet at Quinault Rain Forest Ranger Station for this easy 1-1/2-hour, 3/4-mile walk.
Hoh Rainforest

Hoh Rainforest

HOH RAIN FOREST - The remodeled Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center is open daily 9:00am - 5:00pm. At this visitor center you'll find general park information, a bookshop, maps, and nearby trails. You can get backcountry wilderness permits and bear cans here. There is the Rain Forest Walk at 2pm daily. Learn about giant trees, wildlife and more on this 1-1/2-hour easy walk on the Hall of Mosses or Spruce Nature Trail. Meet at the Hoh Visitor Center. The popular Evening Program begins at 8:00pm at the Hoh Campground amphitheater. Dates and topics on local bulletin boards.
Staircase trailhead sign

Staircase Trailhead Sign

STAIRCASE -  At the south end of Hood Canal you'll find the Staircase entrance to Olympic National Park. The Ranger Station hours vary. They do have information, exhibits, maps, trails nearby. If you are headed into the North Fork of the Skokomish River you will need backcountry wilderness permits and bear cans that are available. Thursday through Sunday at 2:00pm there is a Forest Walk.  Meet at bridge for 1-1/2 -hour walk by the Skokomish River. Discover Staircase!  on Sundays at 10:00am. Meet at the ranger station for this 1/2 -hour talk about the plants, animals or history of Staircase area. Fun for all ages! Evening Program is held Thursday through Saturday 7:30pm. Meet at the Staircase amphitheater.

Thirteen Special Places

Get ready to overload your schedule with 10 + 3 special places on the Olympic Peninsula. There have been several lists compiled over the last few weeks, all with gorgeous photos and travel hints for the peninsula. Let's start with ExOfficio's  10 Totally Amazing Places to See on the Northern Olympic Peninsula. This list has amazing photos, as well as short descriptions of some of our favorite places.
Dungeness Lighthouse

Dungeness Lighthouse

We totally agree that the places on ExOfficio's list shouldn't be missed, but we think there are a couple missed opportunities to get into the flavor, history and fun. Dungeness Spit is mentioned #1 in ExOfficio's list and we are glad it made the list.  Dungeness Spit is especially precious. It's the longest natural sand spit in the USA. The 5.5-mile walk out to the New Dungeness Lighthouse is a test of endurance, since the walk is totally on sand.  You can sign up to be a lighthouse keeper for a week. Lots of responsibility, but a once-in-a-lifetime experience, or as the lighthouse keepers website says, Stay a Week...Memories for a Lifetime!
SR112 Joyce Museum

Joyce Museum

Joyce Museum and Joyce General Store count as one stop.  Summer hours for the museum are Thursday - Monday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Try to go when Margaret is there. She is the all-knowing docent of wisdom when it comes to the area. The log building, built in 1914, was once the train depot. Now it houses historic photographs, newspapers and examples of the days gone by.  Lots of artifacts and info about the recent Elwha River dam removal project is housed here. Take a reality step back in time when you enter the General Store. It's still got its brass mail boxes and absolutely everything you could possibly need - from motor oil to Wesson oil, from brushes to clean mushrooms to brushes to paint the house. Plus they have bumper stickers that say, "I ♥ Joyce", a definite memento for anyone you know named "Joyce".
John's Beachcombing Museum

John's Beachcombing Museum

John's Beachcombing Museum. A new must-do on the peninsula - near Forks. Here are some comments from visitors to this unique collection:
  • "Some very cool and very unusual stuff in there!"
  • "This place is amazing!!! I am an environmental science teacher and I learned an amazing amount of information about what washes up on our shores. Thanks John for a great and informational time."
  • "Absolutely loved our trip through John's museum. It was great listening to John's stories and the kids were totally engaged from the drive in until we drove away... Thanks John, this is a must see and we will be back." Admission to tour the museum is $5. Prepare to spend some time there! It's open 10 a.m.-5 p.m., or for group tours by appointment, for more information or questions call 360-640-0320.    

Dungeness Schoolhouse

If you are in the area during Lavender Weekend, you might want to check the Dungeness Schoolhouse. It's nearby to the farms and festivities in the Sequim-Dungeness area. The schoolhouse is part of the local history. In the early days, the Dungeness area was a thriving community and early settlers saw the need for a school. At a meeting on May 10, 1892, votes were cast in favor of bonding the Dungeness District for $3,000 to buy land which was then cleared and fenced; a two-story schoolhouse was built and furnished on the property. You'll find the schoolhouse off East Anderson Road near the Dungeness River.  On February 27, 1893, the Dungeness School opened with 73 pupils ranging in age from 5 to 20 years. The teacher received $75 a month for a four-month term, ending June 30; living quarters were provided on the second floor. Classes were large and books and supplies were not easy to acquire. School Board minutes from April 8, 1895, show a motion was passed to buy the school a bottle of ink. The photo on the left is from 1893. One can only imagine what it was like to hear the bell ring to call students from throughout the area. And, to know that there were no cell phones or tablets or computers or video games to distract learning.    Today the schoolhouse is still used for classes and programs and can be rented for special events.  The  main classroom area will hold about 30 people. Upstairs is the auditorium with a stage and room for about 90. One modern addition, besides the indoor plumbing and new electrical is the addition of an elevator! Stop by this historic gem and take a step back in time. Hear the bell ring calling you to class?

Travel the Olympic Peninsula w/o a Car

Yes, travel to the Olympic Peninsula without a car can be done

Travel to the Olympic Peninsula without a car can be a challenge, but it can be done. There are many resources to help you plan your visit sans automobile. We hope this blog post will inspire you plan and navigate your way around with a bicycle or on foot. If you are bicycling, check out the Olympic Discovery Trail for transportation corridors across the peninsula. If you are arriving at SEATAC Airport, Seattle, The Dungeness Line or Rocket Transportation shuttles are easy to find at the south end of the airport. The Dungeness Line has a scheduled route, while Rocket Transportation will deliver you to your specified destination.

Links to local websitesto connect around the Olympic Peninsula:

  • Clallam Transit Bus. Contact the Clallam Transit center directly for questions about their routes and prices 800-858-3747.  Keep in mind, also, that you can rack a bicycle on the Clallam Transit buses for free on a  first-come first-served space.
  • Mason County Transit Authority. All MTA buses are equipped with bike racks to carry two or three conventional single seat, two-wheeled bicycles.
  • Jefferson TransitThis website has a page with a listing of other auto-less transportation options for the entire area - Seattle, Victoria, Kitsap, Whidbey Island. A useful resource!
  • Grays Harbor Transit
  • Another option is hiring a private tour guide to take you anywhere you want to go.  Here is a link with a list of them.
If you are based in Port Angeles, you'll find these bus lines with some suggestions of things to see and how to get there.
pt erider a new way to travel in Port Townsend

PTe-rider - a new way to travel in Port Townsend

#30 Port Angeles to Sequim. Once you're in Sequim you can schedule a Dial-a-Ride to take you out to the Dungeness Rec Area where there is camping and hiking.  This needs to be scheduled 24 hours in advance. From Sequim to Port Townsend take the Jefferson Transit #8 bus.  There is a cool new way to explore this charming, Victorian seaport. It's the PTe-rider. Hop aboard the first electric shuttle service in Washington State. Open April through October, they offer taxi service tours of Port Townsend's historic districts. #10 Port Angeles to Joyce on Hwy 112 will drop you off at Camp Hayden Rd. which is about 4 miles south of Salt Creek Recreation Area. It would be a hike to get to Salt Creek, but if it's low tide and you are a tidepooler, it might be worth it. Even if you don't want to go as far as Salt Creek, I'd recommend the blackberry pie at the Blackberry Cafe - also the jalapeno burger if it's still on the menu. Two must dos are the Joyce General Store and the Joyce Museum. Words can't adequately explain - it's part history, part now. Start by talking to Margaret at the museum. She can tell you the historical details, local lore and guide you through the museum that used to be the old railroad station. #20 Port Angeles to the Olympic National Park Visitor Information Center where passes and permits can be bought.  This route will drop you off a couple blocks down the hill from the Visitor Information Center. You would need to hire a vehicle to take you up the mountain, either taxi or guide. Here's a link to guide services.  Green 8 Taxi Service.  Black Tie Taxi Service.
Travel Lake-C-fall-pano-lo.jpg

Lake Crescent

#14 Port Angeles along Hwy 101 around Lake Crescent.  Stopping here at Lake Crescent you can hike to Marymere Falls and into the backcountry. A visit to Lake Crescent Lodge is an historical treat. Sit on the sun porch with cool drink in hand, relaxing in wicker chairs and watching the kayakers and swimmers. This route will also take you to Forks, if you ever want to travel from its serene shores.
Travel Camping on Second Beach

Second Beach

#15 Forks to La Push.  At La Push are the hikes to Second Beach and Third Beach, both great for setting up a tent and falling asleep to the sound of the waves. These beaches are located in the National Park and so camping permits to stay overnight need to be obtained from the Visitor Center in Port Angeles.  There are no amenities or camping sites on these beaches and everything must be packed in and packed back out. Forks south to Lake Quinault. Jefferson Travel from Forks (Forks Transfer Center is located at 552 S Forks Ave & E Street) can take you south to Lake Quinault area, stopping at Lower Hoh, Kalaloch, Queets and then to Amanda Park Mercantile at the lake. From Amanda Park you can transfer to Grays Harbor Transit, which will require a separate fare and exact change. #16 Port Angeles to Neah Bay.  The Makah Reservation has its own bus system once the Clallam County system drops you off.  There is a bus that will take you to the Cape Flattery Trail but contact this bus system directly to make sure.  Cape Flattery is the most NW point of the contiguous United States. There are views of Tattoosh Island and lighthouse along with excellent wildlife viewing. If the whales aren't around, the birds will be. There is no service of this bus system on Saturdays, Sundays, or Holidays. Be sure to visit the Makah Cultural and Resource Center. It's a world-class museum with artifacts and displays highlighting the history and culture of this part of the world.

Travel to Victoria, Canada - Bring your passport!

The side trip popular with many visitors is to travel to Victoria, BC, Canada, is a simple, 90-minutes, walk-on ride on the Coho Ferry. The ferry docks in the beautiful inner harbor across the street from the Parliament Building. Make your visit a "two-nation vacation"! If you are bringing your bike or would just like to have a lovely walk, put the Galloping Goose Trail from Victoria to Sooke on your itinerary. Here are some photos from their website. Have fun and travel safely!

Olympic Peninsula Park Passes Made Simple

Some parks and trailheads around the peninsula require a pass. Generally, you can purchase passes at each entrance to each kind of park. ONP annual passEach national park has its own pass. For example, you could buy an annual pass to Mt. Rainer OR Olympic National Park. This year these cost $50 each. Weekly admissions to the parks are sold at the entrances or Visitor Centers for $20 (going up to $25 on June 1, 2016). Only four entrances require a pass: Hurricane Ridge, Sol Duc, Staircase and Hoh Rain Forest. You can either pay as you enter these entrances or stop at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles to purchase the pass. America the Beautiful Pass is an interagency pass good for all Federal lands - National Parks, National Forest, monuments, etc. This costs $80 for an annual pass. If you plan on bicycling or walking in, it's only $7/person. Learn more here, or check with the park 360-565-3130. Some of the info on their site is outdated. But you will be able to see the different types of passes:
  • Private vehicle
  • Motorcycle
  • Per person
  • Wilderness camping fees
  • Campground fees
  • Commercial tours
  • Non-commercial groups
  • Dump station fees
There is the equivalent to the interagency pass for active military - one year is free with documentation. These are only dispensed by rangers. There is the equivalent of the interagency pass for seniors (62+) or disabled people. This is a lifetime pass that costs $10 and is sold only by rangers to people with proof of eligibility. discover pass logoWashington State Parks, like Fort Worden require a Discover Pass which you can learn about here. If you click here you can see the State Parks By Region which will tell you which parks require which pass. Last time I went to Fort Worden, I just paid at the entrance kiosk by the parking lot. But if you wish to purchase the Discover pass ahead of time you can do there online hereDiscover annual passes ($35 from vendors/$30 if you purchase them at the same time you pay your car license renewals or from a ranger at the park) are for the Washington State parks.  Discover day passes cost $10 ($12 from vendors) and are good for State parks for one day only.  These can be purchased in advance or at the park. Similarly, there is Olympic National Forest (ONF) that offers miles of hiking trails in the woods has a different set of passesForest Service pass. Here is a list of trails that are on ONF land that require an Olympic National Forest pass (different from an Olympic National Park pass). A lot of these spectacular trails are on the east side of the peninsula with access from Hwy 101 along Hood Canal, except for the  Quinault Rain Forest trails, which are in the southwest area of the peninsula. Some, by by no means all of the National Forest trails, require either an annual pass or a day pass for parking. Day passes cost $5. Passes are not sold a the trail heads, so they must be purchased in advance. An annual pass for the National Forests in Washington and Oregon only (no parks and no other state's national forests) costs $30. Print a pass for the ONF on your computer before you come! $5.00
horizontal Hobuck Beach

Hobuck Beach, Neah Bay

If you are headed to Shi Shi Beach, Cape Flattery or other spots in Neah Bay on the Makah Reservation, the Makah Tribe requires visitors to have a $10 Recreation Pass. The Recreational Use Permit (RUP) is available for sale at the Makah Museum, Washburn’s Store and at the Makah Tribal Center at a cost of $10.00 per car and is good for the calendar year in which it is purchased. The permit is required if you are going to engage in recreational activities on the Reservation – hiking, camping, kayaking, sports-fishing, etc.
Dungeness Lighthouse

Dungeness Lighthouse

Also, there is a small fee at the trailhead of $3 per family or per group (up to four adults) at the Dungeness Wildlife Refuge. Children under 16 enter free. Refuge Annual Pass, Federal Recreational Lands Pass, Senior or Golden Age Pass, Access or Golden Access Pass, Military Pass, Volunteer Pass, and a Federal Duck Stamp also admit family or group (up to 4 adults). One of the special things to do in this area is hiking on the Dungeness Spit to the lighthouse at the end of the sandy spit.