Category Archives: Biking

Travel the Olympic Peninsula w/o a Car

Yes, travel to the Olympic Peninsula without a car can be done

Travel to the Olympic Peninsula without a car can be a challenge, but it can be done. There are many resources to help you plan your visit sans automobile. We hope this blog post will inspire you plan and navigate your way around with a bicycle or on foot. If you are bicycling, check out the Olympic Discovery Trail for transportation corridors across the peninsula. If you are arriving at SEATAC Airport, Seattle, The Dungeness Line or Rocket Transportation shuttles are easy to find at the south end of the airport. The Dungeness Line has a scheduled route, while Rocket Transportation will deliver you to your specified destination.

Links to local websitesto connect around the Olympic Peninsula:

  • Clallam Transit Bus. Contact the Clallam Transit center directly for questions about their routes and prices 800-858-3747.  Keep in mind, also, that you can rack a bicycle on the Clallam Transit buses for free on a  first-come first-served space.
  • Mason County Transit Authority. All MTA buses are equipped with bike racks to carry two or three conventional single seat, two-wheeled bicycles.
  • Jefferson TransitThis website has a page with a listing of other auto-less transportation options for the entire area - Seattle, Victoria, Kitsap, Whidbey Island. A useful resource!
  • Grays Harbor Transit
  • Another option is hiring a private tour guide to take you anywhere you want to go.  Here is a link with a list of them.
If you are based in Port Angeles, you'll find these bus lines with some suggestions of things to see and how to get there.
pt erider a new way to travel in Port Townsend

PTe-rider - a new way to travel in Port Townsend

#30 Port Angeles to Sequim. Once you're in Sequim you can schedule a Dial-a-Ride to take you out to the Dungeness Rec Area where there is camping and hiking.  This needs to be scheduled 24 hours in advance. From Sequim to Port Townsend take the Jefferson Transit #8 bus.  There is a cool new way to explore this charming, Victorian seaport. It's the PTe-rider. Hop aboard the first electric shuttle service in Washington State. Open April through October, they offer taxi service tours of Port Townsend's historic districts. #10 Port Angeles to Joyce on Hwy 112 will drop you off at Camp Hayden Rd. which is about 4 miles south of Salt Creek Recreation Area. It would be a hike to get to Salt Creek, but if it's low tide and you are a tidepooler, it might be worth it. Even if you don't want to go as far as Salt Creek, I'd recommend the blackberry pie at the Blackberry Cafe - also the jalapeno burger if it's still on the menu. Two must dos are the Joyce General Store and the Joyce Museum. Words can't adequately explain - it's part history, part now. Start by talking to Margaret at the museum. She can tell you the historical details, local lore and guide you through the museum that used to be the old railroad station. #20 Port Angeles to the Olympic National Park Visitor Information Center where passes and permits can be bought.  This route will drop you off a couple blocks down the hill from the Visitor Information Center. You would need to hire a vehicle to take you up the mountain, either taxi or guide. Here's a link to guide services.  Green 8 Taxi Service.  Black Tie Taxi Service.
Travel Lake-C-fall-pano-lo.jpg

Lake Crescent

#14 Port Angeles along Hwy 101 around Lake Crescent.  Stopping here at Lake Crescent you can hike to Marymere Falls and into the backcountry. A visit to Lake Crescent Lodge is an historical treat. Sit on the sun porch with cool drink in hand, relaxing in wicker chairs and watching the kayakers and swimmers. This route will also take you to Forks, if you ever want to travel from its serene shores.
Travel Camping on Second Beach

Second Beach

#15 Forks to La Push.  At La Push are the hikes to Second Beach and Third Beach, both great for setting up a tent and falling asleep to the sound of the waves. These beaches are located in the National Park and so camping permits to stay overnight need to be obtained from the Visitor Center in Port Angeles.  There are no amenities or camping sites on these beaches and everything must be packed in and packed back out. Forks south to Lake Quinault. Jefferson Travel from Forks (Forks Transfer Center is located at 552 S Forks Ave & E Street) can take you south to Lake Quinault area, stopping at Lower Hoh, Kalaloch, Queets and then to Amanda Park Mercantile at the lake. From Amanda Park you can transfer to Grays Harbor Transit, which will require a separate fare and exact change. #16 Port Angeles to Neah Bay.  The Makah Reservation has its own bus system once the Clallam County system drops you off.  There is a bus that will take you to the Cape Flattery Trail but contact this bus system directly to make sure.  Cape Flattery is the most NW point of the contiguous United States. There are views of Tattoosh Island and lighthouse along with excellent wildlife viewing. If the whales aren't around, the birds will be. There is no service of this bus system on Saturdays, Sundays, or Holidays. Be sure to visit the Makah Cultural and Resource Center. It's a world-class museum with artifacts and displays highlighting the history and culture of this part of the world.

Travel to Victoria, Canada - Bring your passport!

The side trip popular with many visitors is to travel to Victoria, BC, Canada, is a simple, 90-minutes, walk-on ride on the Coho Ferry. The ferry docks in the beautiful inner harbor across the street from the Parliament Building. Make your visit a "two-nation vacation"! If you are bringing your bike or would just like to have a lovely walk, put the Galloping Goose Trail from Victoria to Sooke on your itinerary. Here are some photos from their website. Have fun and travel safely!

Adventure Travelers Winter Itinerary #101 for the OP

snowboarders2010 agreementAdventure Travelers Winter Itinerary #101 for Washington’s Olympic Peninsula

Winter activities on the Olympic Peninsula are pretty much the same as what you can do during any other time of the year – just with different attire! Hiking, kayaking, surfing, biking.

Two-day Adventure on the Olympic Peninsula

Arrival Evening in Port Angeles or surrounding area Go for a run or bike ride along the Olympic Discovery Trail. Be sure to put your lights on! Day 1 ~ Hurricane Ridge - Get up early and head to Hurricane Ridge for some outdoor altitude play!  A 45-minute drive takes you into the Olympic Mountains. The road is scheduled to be open Fridays through Sundays and Monday holidays through the end of March, weather permitting. Depending on the weather, it will also be open December 26 to January 3. If the parking lot gets too full, the road may close temporarily, so an early start is good thing! Sitting atop an alpine meadow is the day lodge and observation point. From here you have many choices whether there is snow or no snow! No snow? Wander along the trails and stop at great spots for photo opportunities. Snow? Skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoe, snow board! Carrying chains in the car is mandatory during the winter. Take the Ranger-led snowshoe walk that is about a mile and takes about 90 minutes. Learn lots and see the area in a new way. Sign up at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center when you get there. These walks fill up fast. Minimal cost of $7.00 for adults. $3 for children 6 – 15. Free for children 5 and younger. Scope out places to take your cross-country daring-do. Here’s the scoop for Hurricane Ridge.

Hurricane Ridge Visitors Center

Wilderness Information Center

Olympic National Park

http://www.nps.gov/olym/

3002 Mount Angeles Road

Port Angeles, WA 98362

360-565-3130

Day 2 ~ Kayaking the the Morning  - Depart for Lake Crescent area A deep, clear 12-mile long lake in the Olympic National Park, 17 miles west of Port Angeles along Hwy 101. There are several spot to launch: Fairholm at the far west end, public boat launch at Barnes Point or in front of Lake Crescent Lodge. Other nooks and launch areas can be found. Enjoy the gorgeousness of this special place. Short paddle, long paddle, your choice. Be aware that the weather can change very rapidly on the lake and the wind usually starts to gather steam at noon. Feel like a short hike to loosen up the legs after sitting in the kayak? Trail options around the Barnes Point area are:  the Moments in Time or Marymere Falls.  The hike to Mount Storm King is longer and difficult but well worth the steep climb. Be REALLY careful in the winter when the ground is slippery. The cliffs are non-forgiving. If it is snowy or icy, save it for summer! Moments in Time Nature Trail is approximately a ½-mile loop trail and offers nice views of the lake and winds through old-growth forest and former homestead sites. It is located between Nature Bridge and Lake Crescent Lodge. A 1/3-mile trail extends from Storm King Ranger Station parking lot. Marymere Falls is a spectacular 90' waterfall just one mile from Lake Crescent. The trail leads through old growth forest with flowering plants and mushrooms in season. If it’s snowing or freezing cold the waterfall becomes fairyland like you’ve never seen. Totally worth the hike, but be really careful crossing the bridge and along the switchbacks. Across the lake near the headwaters of the Lyre River you’ll find the Spruce Railroad Trail that is also part of the Olympic Discovery Trail. The Spruce Railroad Trail connects the North Shore of Lake Crescent and Lyre River trailheads. Much of this relatively flat 4-mile trail runs on or adjacent to the World War I Spruce Railway bed and offers excellent Lake Crescent views.

Have a safe, warm, adventurous time!

OlympicDiscoveryTrail – Lowland fun during winter

ODT Trailhead

ODT Trailhead

Last time we walked part of the Olympic Discovery Trail, it was a colorful canopy of leaves above and a scattering of color underfoot. Leaves fell like huge, lazy orange snowflakes, except not wet and cold! We're so lucky to experience the Trail in all seasons. Now, with winter is full 50 degree weather, it's still the perfect time to get in a good walk (or ride) without having to venture too far from home base. One of the favorite rides is the 3.3 section from the 18th Street trail head west of Port Angeles to the Elwha River Bridge. Ride onto the lower deck of the bridge to and duck out of a brief rainstorm. Return in the spring to watch salmon returning upstream to the river and its tributaries. Last fall fish were spotted upstream of the upper dam for the first time in 100 years and they still know where to return! Ain't nature wonderful! Here's a video that was done a while ago, but it might give you some ideas of where to take a winter ride or walk between Port Angeles and Sequim. I know there are wildflowers, leafy green trees and sunny meadows in the video, but, hey, we don't stay indoors because of a little coastal mist. All the way from Port Townsend to La Push. Pick a spot, any spot, along the way for an outing. Our winter has been so mild (so far) and we've been able to play outside most of the season. Aren't we lucky? Come join us. The Olympic Discovery Trail has places along the way to stop and get warm, dry out and start all over again!    

Olympic Discovery Trail

Olympic Discovery TrailThe Olympic Discovery Trail connects North Olympic Peninsula towns on the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the Pacific Coast. This unique way to explore the Olympic Peninsula includes more than 130 miles of paved trails which wind through towns, forests, river valleys, mountains, and coastlines. The Olympic Discovery Trail (ODT) is open to travelers, and their pets, using non-motorized modes of transportation. This includes hiking, cycling, and horseback riding. ODT can be done as a whole or broken into smaller sections for shorter day trips. The four main sections are:
  • East End the Sound and Bay Section which includes Port Townsend, Discovery Bay, Sequim Bay, and Miller Peninsula
  • East Central the River and Prairie Section with Blyn, Sequim, Dungeness Prairie Cross, and Port Angeles Harbor
  • West Central the Foothills and Lake Section which includes Port Angeles, Elwha River, Lake Crescent, and Joyce
  • West End the Forest and Ocean Section with Sol Duc Valley, Forks, and Pacific Beaches Continue reading