Category Archives: Other

Washington Coast Cleanup

clean up crew

Thank You Coast Savers Crew

Washington Coast Cleanup: Registration Now Open!  The Washington Coast Cleanup will be on Saturday, April 23rd. Online registration is now open at www.coastsavers.org. Join us for the largest beach cleanup effort in the state! Invite your friends and family and make a weekend out of it among old friends or new. There are some awesome BBQs and special events being provided by our partners that weekend. Check out the list below. Last year, over 1,500 volunteers removed at least 19 tons of debris from almost 50 beaches. This year could be even bigger with all the debris that’s washed in with the winter storms. BBQ’S & SPECIAL EVENTS FOR COASTSAVERS Friday, April 22 Saturday, April 23
  • Soup Feed at Moose Lodge in Ocean Park, noon – 1:30 p.m.
  • Surfrider BBQ at Twin Harbors State Park, noon – 1 p.m.
  • Washington State Parks Ranger Association BBQ at Griffiths-Priday State Park, noon – 1:30 p.m.
  • (CoastSavers Fundraiser) Seafood Boil, Mill 109 Restaurant, Seabrook, noon – 2 p.m.
  • Kalaloch Lodge BBQ, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Surfrider BBQ at Three Rivers Fire Station, 11:30 a.m. – 3
  • Friends of Olympic National Park, Refreshments at Lake Ozette Registration Station
  • The Lost Resort at Ozette serves up Rob’s famous 15-bean soup, noon – 2 p.m.
  • Surfrider BBQ at Hobuck Beach Campground, noon – 2 p.m.
  • Chito Beach Resort, 1 – 4 p.m.
  • Port Townsend Coop, $5 in store credit for volunteers
  • River and Ocean Film Festival, Rainforest Arts Center in Forks, 7 p.m.
If you haven’t participated in a cleanup in a while, now is the time. We need your help and the beach needs your help. And, if you have never participated, DO IT! It's a blast and a great thing for our beaches. Be among your peeps! You'll feel good getting the beaches ready for the season of camping, tidepooling and strolling the clean beach! To the beach, for the beach!

6 Travel Tips for this Spring

Here are six travel tips from a native Olympic Peninsula-ite, who thinks that winter and spring are special times to enjoy the outdoors here. Yes, of course, it can rain, but good gear will negate any reasons to not get out there to enjoy the lush greens and fresh air. You can find exquisite glimpses of nature that only happen at this time of year. There is a quiet solitude on most trails and the beaches entertain the changing weather. Late winter, early spring are good times to come visit. Whether you storm watch or shred the ski slopes, you'll find yourself renewed.
Marymere Falls near Lake Crescent in Winter

Marymere Falls near Lake Crescent in Winter

  1. TRAVEL TIP #1.  Do some research before you come. If you aren't one to make reservations ahead, at least check to see if there are activities that may limit hotel availability so you will be prepared. Be sure places you want to go are open and accessible on the days you plan to come. For example, at this time, the Hurricane Ridge Road is open Friday - Sunday. And it depends on the weather. Have a back up plan to find snow if the 'Ridge road is closed and that's your destination. Don't over plan. Give yourself time to enjoy being here. The Olympic Peninsula Travel Planner can help with ideas. OlympicPeninsula.org. PS. If you are bringing your dog, be sure check out the Dog-Friendly Map info from another blog.
  2. TRAVEL TIP #2. Plan your visit by drive times, not by miles. Drive times and distance don't always make sense. For example, if you are planning to drive directly to Neah Bay from Seattle it is only 154 miles, but it takes about 4-1/4 hours to get there. Magnificent scenery along the way, but no freeways. From Port Angeles to Forks, it is 56 miles and takes about 1-1/4 hours. These times are dependent on traffic and weather conditions. Give yourself plenty of time to enjoy the journey. Please obey the speed limit. There are multiple law enforcement agencies that will be watching!
  3. TRAVEL TIP #3. Pack for wearing layers and bring some rain gear. That's an all-season recommendation for the Olympic Peninsula. You can drive from a sunny Blue Hole in Sequim to the damp, wet rain forest. Some tennis shoes are good for hiking on slick boardwalks and sturdy hiking boots are good for trails if they are muddy. I've seen flip-flops on the beach in the winter and wondered if the people hadn't packed correctly, if they were trying to be one with the Pacific Ocean, or if they were just teenagers. I'm pretty sure their feet were cold no matter their reasons!
  4. TRAVEL TIP #4. Budget accordingly. Ferry (if you take one), gas, food, lodging, park permits, attraction fees and souvenirs. The Olympic Peninsula is abundant with things to do for free and low cost. Check out a previous blog for some free suggestions.
  5. TRAVEL TIP #5. Check out what the locals are doing. The communities around the peninsula are little jewels to explore. Take a look at the local papers, or bulletin boards at grocery stores or shop windows. Join the people who live here to see what they support in their communities. You can find everything from gem shows, to yoga retreats, to baking classes, to fly tying workshops, to "you-name-it" gatherings, to great local theater.
  6. TRAVEL TIP #6. Be realistic. I guess this is the biggest tip - to be realistic. Have an idea what you'd like to do, but remember all the variables. Weather, distance being the two main ones. Don't try to do too much. Come and visit multiple times. Enjoy what you can do while you are here. Maybe one trip is only to go to Sol Duc Hot Springs and see one waterfall there. Maybe the next time you'll go to the beach and stay, checking out a couple nearby beaches. The next time, maybe you will only camp at the Hoh Rainforest and do the hikes from the campground and take a raft trip down the river. You couldn't do all of those itineraries in one weekend. Well, I guess you could, but you'd need some R&R when you got home!
Enjoy your visit. Relax, play, and let the nature of the Olympic Peninsula soak into you.

Hummingbirds in the winter? Yes!

Anna's hummingbirdIf you are a birder, young or old, you'll add to your life list on the Olympic Peninsula. I'm interested in them, but I'm not a birder - YET. I know that this area almost always leads Washington State in high counts of species during spring migration. The Christmas bird count a big annual event for the Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park along the Olympic Peninsula Discovery Trail. The reason for my investigation?  I've noticed hummers hanging around my house for the last few days. My curiosity was up. So I started some research about these lovely little guys that chose to stay here in the winter. Boy, was I surprised.     In looking for bird information, I found listings for over 350 species that visit the Olympic Peninsula. We have three different types of hummers. Anna's, Calliope and Rufous Hummingbirds all have been reported. Maybe on examination, I think I know which one I saw. Anna's like to live in the forests, brush areas and in town. It is a permanent resident along the West Coast from British Columbia to northern Mexico. Calliope's like to live in the forests and have only been seen on the Olympic Peninsula a few times. They are the smallest - about three inches long. (The ones I saw seemed more robust!) That leaves the Rufous hummingbirds. They live in forest, brush areas and in town. They are rarely seen in the winter. They are common in the spring and early summer, and fairly common in the fall. So I probably am not seeing Calliope's or Rufous. But, I want more information. An email to my birder friend says that Anna's should be the only ones hanging around at this time of year. According to ebird.org, there was a registered siting in Neah Bay on February 1. And, Anna's have been seen on Ediz Hook in Port Angeles within the last couple weeks. Conclusion: Anna's Hummingbirds are at my house! All this is fascinating to me. Think how far birds travel during their life times. Much farther than many of us do over the course of our life times. This graphic from Cornell Labs totally mesmerized me. Be sure to watch the animated migration.
Watch the animated version to see how far birds actually travel

Watch the animated version to see how far birds actually travel

Winter in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Olympic Coast Marine Sanctuary photo - Winter Storm

Olympic Coast Marine Sanctuary photo

A winter visit to Washington’s Olympic Coast provides opportunities for a unique and rewarding experience. You will likely encounter few visitors, giving you an even greater appreciation for the remote wilderness of our rugged coastline. Winter storms create fascinating wave-watching conditions, with wind, rain and high tides yielding dramatic scenes of waves crashing against the rocky shores, as well as the numerous seastacks dotting the nearshore environment. Dress for the weather and make it a memorable day reveling in one of nature's best winter wonders. The winter is also a popular time for marine debris to wash up on shore. This is the perfect time for beach combing. If you feel like doing something wonderful for the environment, bring gloves and disposable bags to collect trash from the pristine environment you are enjoying and help keep our beaches clean and our marine organisms safe. You may even be rewarded by finding a rare item while beach combing - such as a prized glass float. Particularly high, or “King Tides”, during this period take place on the following dates (based on  December 23 high tide of 9.71 ft at 10:07am  December 24 high tide of 9.84 ft at 10:55am  December 25 high tide of 9.81 ft at 11:41am  December 26 high tide of 9.59 ft at 12:25pm  January 9 high tide of 9.2 ft at 11:24am  January 10 high tide of 9.37 ft at 12:06pm  January 11 high tide of 9.37 ft at 12:48pm  January 21 high tide of 9.16 ft at 9:54am  January 22 high tide of 9.27 ft at 10:45am  January 23 high tide of 9.28 ft at 11:31am  January 24 high tide of 9.17 ft at 12:14pm For more information and locations of King Tides, visit:

Tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov

Remember to stay safe while enjoying the moody beauty of our Olympic Coast!

For more information about Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, visit: OlympicCoast.noaa.gov Facebook at www.facebook.com/usolympiccoastgov/

Twitter at Twitter.com/OlympicCoast

Thanks to Karlyn Langjahr, guest Blogger:  Olympic Coast Discovery Center Manager

Adventure Travelers Winter Itinerary #101 for the OP

snowboarders2010 agreementAdventure Travelers Winter Itinerary #101 for Washington’s Olympic Peninsula

Winter activities on the Olympic Peninsula are pretty much the same as what you can do during any other time of the year – just with different attire! Hiking, kayaking, surfing, biking.

Two-day Adventure on the Olympic Peninsula

Arrival Evening in Port Angeles or surrounding area Go for a run or bike ride along the Olympic Discovery Trail. Be sure to put your lights on! Day 1 ~ Hurricane Ridge - Get up early and head to Hurricane Ridge for some outdoor altitude play!  A 45-minute drive takes you into the Olympic Mountains. The road is scheduled to be open Fridays through Sundays and Monday holidays through the end of March, weather permitting. Depending on the weather, it will also be open December 26 to January 3. If the parking lot gets too full, the road may close temporarily, so an early start is good thing! Sitting atop an alpine meadow is the day lodge and observation point. From here you have many choices whether there is snow or no snow! No snow? Wander along the trails and stop at great spots for photo opportunities. Snow? Skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoe, snow board! Carrying chains in the car is mandatory during the winter. Take the Ranger-led snowshoe walk that is about a mile and takes about 90 minutes. Learn lots and see the area in a new way. Sign up at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center when you get there. These walks fill up fast. Minimal cost of $7.00 for adults. $3 for children 6 – 15. Free for children 5 and younger. Scope out places to take your cross-country daring-do. Here’s the scoop for Hurricane Ridge.

Hurricane Ridge Visitors Center

Wilderness Information Center

Olympic National Park

http://www.nps.gov/olym/

3002 Mount Angeles Road

Port Angeles, WA 98362

360-565-3130

Day 2 ~ Kayaking the the Morning  - Depart for Lake Crescent area A deep, clear 12-mile long lake in the Olympic National Park, 17 miles west of Port Angeles along Hwy 101. There are several spot to launch: Fairholm at the far west end, public boat launch at Barnes Point or in front of Lake Crescent Lodge. Other nooks and launch areas can be found. Enjoy the gorgeousness of this special place. Short paddle, long paddle, your choice. Be aware that the weather can change very rapidly on the lake and the wind usually starts to gather steam at noon. Feel like a short hike to loosen up the legs after sitting in the kayak? Trail options around the Barnes Point area are:  the Moments in Time or Marymere Falls.  The hike to Mount Storm King is longer and difficult but well worth the steep climb. Be REALLY careful in the winter when the ground is slippery. The cliffs are non-forgiving. If it is snowy or icy, save it for summer! Moments in Time Nature Trail is approximately a ½-mile loop trail and offers nice views of the lake and winds through old-growth forest and former homestead sites. It is located between Nature Bridge and Lake Crescent Lodge. A 1/3-mile trail extends from Storm King Ranger Station parking lot. Marymere Falls is a spectacular 90' waterfall just one mile from Lake Crescent. The trail leads through old growth forest with flowering plants and mushrooms in season. If it’s snowing or freezing cold the waterfall becomes fairyland like you’ve never seen. Totally worth the hike, but be really careful crossing the bridge and along the switchbacks. Across the lake near the headwaters of the Lyre River you’ll find the Spruce Railroad Trail that is also part of the Olympic Discovery Trail. The Spruce Railroad Trail connects the North Shore of Lake Crescent and Lyre River trailheads. Much of this relatively flat 4-mile trail runs on or adjacent to the World War I Spruce Railway bed and offers excellent Lake Crescent views.

Have a safe, warm, adventurous time!

What Kind of Traveler are YOU?

What Kind of Traveler Are YOU?  When you travel are you a foodie, an adventure traveler, a family traveler or are you looking for that perfect romantic getaway? Or is your travel a little bit of each? At the Olympic Peninsula Tourism Summit this fall, we asked local tourism industry experts to help put together a list of hidden gems that these types of travelers to the Olympic Peninsula shouldn’t miss. We have some ideas for each of these types of unique travelers and have a Winter Weekend Itinerary for each. FIRST, who are you? Here’s a list of characteristics of four different types of travelers: Do you travel to eat and take in all the culinary delights a region has to offer? Seek out restaurants specializing in “farm to fork” cuisine? Tour the local wineries, cideries and distilleries? Visit local farms, shellfish growers, and farmers markets?  You might be a Foodie Traveler. Do you…
  • ... search Yelp or TripAdvisor for restaurants with high reviews and read all the restaurant ads in magazines before planning your next travel destination?
  • ...have friends who tell you about a chef in an area that prepares amazing local, sustainable food and you start researching how to get there ASAP?
  • ...watch TV shows that are on the Food Network and the Cooking Channel?
You could start planning your trip by looking at the Olympic Peninsula Culinary Loop’s map. It’s got yummy places to eat and where experience the local delights Foodie Traveler Itinerary #214 is for a hybrid traveler, which we assume most people are, a Romantic/Foodie might want to take advantage of the Olympic Peninsula Winery Tour in February. It's the Red Wine and Chocolate Tour. We wait for this all year! Hurricane RidgeAdventure Traveler.  If this is you, you just want to be outside, no matter the weather. You look for exciting, challenging things like surfing, backpacking, mountain climbing, kayaking, cycling, fishing, sailing, or hiking. For you, it’s all about the experience and the challenge, plus getting back to nature with the thrill of excitement. This character might be about to embark on a hike in Olympic National Park or surf for the first time on the coast. You might be an Adventure Traveler if…
  • …Washington Trail Association’s website is set as a browser favorite.
  • …the trunk of your car is a storage unit for at-the-ready adventures; a sleeping pad, dusty hiking boots, snow shoes, extra socks, bug spray, a carabineer.
  • …you are blown away by Ed Viesters and like each and every one of his Facebook posts.
  • … you love dirt and you tear up a little removing your bike rack at the end of the riding season
Check out Adventure Traveler Itinerary #101 for a great winter three-day escape to the Olympic Peninsula. Some biking, running, snow play and kayaking! Family Traveler.  Are you all about doing things as a family, teaching the kids about the cool stuff there is to see and do on the Olympic Peninsula? Winter activities could include attending museums, going to some of the aquariums and science centers.  You might be a Family Traveler if…
  • …you plan based on what and where are we going to find something to do for everyone.
  • …your activities include touching, tugging, digging and discovering (running up, down and all around while discovering awesome stuff)
  • …you want to avoid driving endless hours and plan ahead for stop-offs every 60-90
  • … you are driven to make meaningful memories where coming away with some sand or dirt between our fingers and toes
Families are looking for inspiring ideas for things to do together over a couple days on the Olympic Peninsula should check the list of Free Things to Do on the Family Travel Itinerary #101 to figure out what suits you. Fourth graders are part of a project called "Every Kid in a Park" and can get a free Annual Pass to all of America's 58 National Parks! (https://www.everykidinapark.gov/) Romantic Getaway Traveler.  Just want to take off with your sweetie? Just the two of you? Rekindle something or nurture a new relationship?  Leave stress and your hectic life with kids or crazy schedules behind. Look for romantic dinners, cozy places to stay, spots where you can be alone. You might be a Romantic Traveler if…
  • …you seek out locations that will provide privacy
  • …you travel to make memories and plan trips that provide stress-free ease of travel
  • …you appreciate the journey as much as the destination
  • …you will make dining choices on atmosphere as much as on the food
Check out Inns of Excellence for B&B ideas for the romantic getaway you'd like to plan. Our guess is that you are probably a combination of these travelers, so we hope our itineraries will help give you some suggestions to get away to the Olympic Peninsula over the winter months. Blogs to come with more itinerary details and ideas.    

Two Military Airplane Mysteries

Tubal Cain Mine

Tubal Cain Mine

Downed Plane Story One.  The Tubal Cain Mine trail in the Buckhorn Wilderness on the east side of the Olympic Peninsula follows a pack trail dating from the 1890s. It’s a dog-friendly trail to the remains of the old mine site and the site of a 1952 airplane crash close to the mine. This trail is often hiked in early summer through fall and is known, not only for its history, but also for its abundant wildflower blooms. Washington Trail Association has a good explanation of the trail. And the Tubal Cain Mine History website has details, a great old photo and a map, if you are interested The story of the World War II military airplane crash is pretty well-known around the peninsula. In winter, a B-17 with eight crew members aboard was flying in a blizzard with a radio that didn’t work. The airplane hit a ridge and slid down the mountain leaving a trail of debris. Three of the eight crew members died in the crash. The remaining five survivors were rescued the next day by helicopter from a shelter they had constructed out of parachutes and the lifeboat that had been on board the plane. Locals and visitors have been intrigued with this story and have explored the area for many years.  According to Waymarking.com, the intriguing part of the lore around this crash is that the airplane might have been “returning from a mission to spy on Russians”, which might explain why the “US Government was quickly on the scene to salvage key parts of the wreckage!” The official story is “that it was returning from a search mission to locate survivors from a Korean airlift airplane that had gone down near Sandspit, BC, Canada.” Read Waymarking.com’s description of the event here. If you hike to the wreckage, please remember that the nearby mine is too dangerous to enter. Do not go in it. Plus, it is owned privately. Please read and follow any posted signs.
Convair F-106A Delta Dart before the crash. (Courtesy Ernie White/McChord Air Museum

A Convair F-106A Delta Dart before the crash. (Courtesy Ernie White/McChord Air Museum

Airplane wreckage

Part of an F-106 that crashed in 1964. The wereckage is in a stand of trees that hasn't been harvested - or visited in 50 years. (Courtest of Austin Lunn-Rhue)

Downed Plane Story Two.  On the west side of the Olympic Peninsula there is another mysterious downed airplane story. This one is on private land so there is no access to the site, but the story is interesting. An Air Force F-106, “the last breed of interceptors conceived and designed to interdict Soviet ‘heavy’ nuclear bombers, crashed in 1964. This aircraft was “considered the most powerful air-to-air weapon ever developed in the United States”. To follow this story in length, Air & Space Smithsonian has an article by Ed Darack from November 16, 2015. The wreckage was re-discovered June 2014 by Austin Lunn-Rhue, a newly employed forester at a timber company on the Olympic Peninsula, and his forestry partner.  They could tell it was part of an aircraft and one of the pieces had a paint brush X on it, which was unusual because the logging industry uses a form of spray paint.  In addition to that, the wreckage was on private land where no one is allowed. “…The mission of the plane that morning in 1964 remains a mystery.” It might have been scrambled toward a formation of Soviet bombers that had gotten too close to the USA. It’s also listed as a routine training flight. We do know that the pilot, Captain Webb H. Huss, Jr., parachuted to safety, was picked up by a boater on Lake Ozette and flown in a helicopter from Paine Air Force Base to a hospital. Which hospital? You can read more at 318 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, Green Dragons, with photos of the plane, the wreckage and Captain Huss. Thank you very much to Air & Space and to Mr. Darack and McChord Air Museum for giving us permission to quote some from his article and for letting us share the photographs and links to the longer story. Lets hope this part of our history does get transferred to the museum! The Olympic Peninsula has a long military history. More blogs to come about Fort Flagler, Fort Worden and other military history.

News Spotlight on the OP!

The Olympic Peninsula has been all over media in September! Here's a sampling of what's being said: Congratulations to Port Townsend for the “5 Fabulous Things to Do In Port Townsend” by writer, Paola Thomas, for Seattle Refined, a partner with KOMONews.
  • Breakfast at the Blue Moose Café,
  • Visit the Northwest Maritime Center,
  • Shop at Port Townsend Farmers’ Market
  • Afternoon tea at Pippa’s Real Tea, and
  • Shopping on Water Street.
The Olympic Peninsula is so proud of the Olympic Discovery Trail (ODT). Terri Gleich of the Kitsap Sun covered “Olympic Discovery Trail an Expanding Wonder”.  Almost 80 miles of the trail are complete. The ODT is used for both commuting and recreation and will eventually link Port Townsend to La Push with a paved path.
Port Angeles during Crab Festival

Port Angeles during Crab Festival

Of course, the Olympic Peninsula is taking some of the cudos for Port Angeles being named one of the “America’s Best Towns” by Outside Magazine. Second only to Chattanooga, Tennessee, Port Angeles made a strong showing, coming from a wild-card placement in the competition. And, with a population of about nine times smaller than Chattanooga, it’s even more impressive to have lost in the polling by a small margin. The top five places went to:
  • Glenwood Springs, Colorado
  • Eau Claire, Wisconsin
  • Iowa City, Iowa
  • Port Angeles, Washington
  • Chattanooga, Tennessee
Olympic National Park Sign at Rialto Beach

ONP Sign at Rialto

Tripping, the world’s largest vacation rental site, named Rialto Beach, in Olympic National Park, one of "10 Perfect Honeymoon Beach Destinations". Other places mentioned were Honeymoon Beach in St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands; Wailea Beach on Maui, Hawaii; Carmel in California; and, Hanalei Bay on Kauai, Hawaii. Take a look as some stunning photographs from Shi Shi Beach from an article written by Kristin Jackson for the Seattle Times, "Visiting Washington’s wild and magical Shi Shi Beach". We couldn’t agree more that’s it one of the most stunning, magical places on the Peninsula! Moira Macdonald, a Seattle Times arts writer, captured the charm and essence of Port Townsend in her article, "There’s Something for All Kinds of Tourists in the Olympic Peninsula Town" – culture, history and the outdoors!
Washington State Ferry

Washington State Ferry

Conde Nast Traveler has named the Washington State Ferry System as one of the most beautiful ferry rides in the world. And, we're in good company with Hong Kong, London, Sydney and Venice also being in this group! Why not hop on one of those WA State ferries and come out to the Olympic Peninsula, our very own UNESCO World Heritage site, the Olympic National Park.  The journey is part of the fun!  
Olympic Peninsula Sol Duc pools

Sol Duc pools

Here is a link to the online version of an article on Northwest hot springs resorts by Tamara Muldoon. This article, Play, Soak, Repeat at Hot Springs Resorts, includes Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort in Olympic National Park. The resort, open seasonally, has basic yet comfortable cabins, RV and tent campsites. Three hot spring pools, a freshwater swimming pool, massage, hiking trails complete the experience at Sol Duc.

Accessible Travel on the Olympic Peninsula

Here's a video from the National Forest Service. It takes a quick tour around the Hwy 101 Loop of places to go and things to see that are wheelchair accessible. This is the first blog to start gathering information about wheelchair accessible travel on the Olympic Peninsula. If you can add additional places or ideas for wheelchair exploration, please comment here, or email to communications@olympicpeninsula.org. We want to build an all-inclusive data base! One new great new possibility on the Olympic Peninsula is going for a ride up in a hot air balloon to view the peninsula from above! There is a company based in Sequim, called Morning Star Balloon Co.  An article in the Peninsula Daily News  by Chris McDaniel on Sept. 23, talked about Captain-Crystal Stout, the Chief Flight Officer and Owner, and the special, two-seated aircraft designed for challenged individuals. Captain-Crystal is also the Executive Director of a fantastic non-profit, 501(c)3 foundation called Dream Catcher Balloon Program. To find out more about this awesome program go to Dream Catcher Balloon Program.
PDN article

PDN article. READ MORE

While the weather is still nice this fall, Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center and the Meadow Loop Trails are a good place to get outside and enjoy the wonderful views of the Olympic Mountains to the south, and Vancouver Island and the San Juan Islands to the north. The Loop Trails offer several short, flat viewing areas. Check out TripAdvisor for some lovely photos of the area. Madison Creek Falls on the Olympic Peninsula Waterfall Trail has a paved trail that runs from the parking lot to the base of the falls. This 200-foot path is paved and near a great spot for picnicking.   Check out OlympicPeninsula.org website for a list of accessible accommodations.  

WHALE WATCHING! Post from Guest Bloggers

Two friends of ours, here on the Olympic Peninsula, submitted a recount of their special day whale watching. We don't know about you, but we want to go, too! From Ali and Brian, hosts at Chito Beach Resort: Having a free day, which we don't get often since we are usually busy with guests, we decided to take full advantage of our time and go out on a whale watching trip. We decided to go from Port Angeles with Port Angeles Whale Watch. The crew of three were fun and accommodating. The crew consisted of the Captain, a marine biologist and the galley chef.  Lucky us to have a biologist on board! He gave us information and updates on all the sea life we saw during the excursion.  The galley chef make hot chocolate, tea and warm food for all those in need. We were indeed spoiled for the day.
brians whales #1

Photos by Brian H Photography

The weather was brian whales #3 brian whales #2perfect and the Captain did a great job navigating us to the whales! We saw several Humpbacks on two occasions and the L pod of Orca, including the newest member- a two-week-old killer whale. We often see whales in the waters off the shore at Chito Beach, but this was so special seeing them from a different perspective. It was a day we'll remember. Here's access to information about the L pod. And a link to the Whale Trail. Chito Beach Resort is one of several accommodations along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. You will find a list of other places to stay beginning on page 31 of the Olympic Peninsula Travel Planner. Whale Watching Tours. Find local whale watching businesses. Make your own special day.