Tag Archives: Neah Bay

The 10th Annual, 61-mile Great Strait Garage Sale & Birthday Party

September 8 - 10. Get ready for a long garage sale - plus a birthday party? Help celebrate 10 years of bringing this event to the public. So much fun. Here's a milepost by milepost rundown of some of the fun ahead on Hwy 112. And, if you can't make it this year, put it on the calendar for next year. It's local fun at its best. It just keeps getting bigger and better.
  • Advertised Sales … East to West by Mileposts (mp) Watch for other sales signed on the road that are not advertised here.
  • Oxenford Farm Garage Sale … 676 Oxenford Road located between mp 57/56. Fall clean up on the farm with something for everyone. Produce, jellies, apple and berry pies, baked goods, quilts and bags, exercise equipment, misc. household and furniture items.
  • Multi-Family Garage Sale … 81 Hart Road (off Freshwater Bay Road, up 9/10 mi. turn left) mp 57/56 Tools, fishing gear, truck, saddles and horse tack, household, washer/dryer … LOTS of everything!
  • Fire Department Community Appreciation Open House…51250 Hwy 112 between mp 52/51 Just east of Joyce General Store. Check out our yard sale from 11am-3pm. Stop by for a free hot dog and water, and meet some of our volunteer firefighters and our commissioners.
  • JOYCE COMMUNITY SITE … At Joyce Depot Museum mp 51 Drawing for a give-away “birthday” cake to celebrate the 10 th Great Strait Sale
  • Plant sale … Joyce Community Site … Joyce Depot Museum mp 51 Young, unusual geraniums for your indoor winter pleasure. Assorted succulents. Organic tomatoes. Oma’s Acres. Gertie Rohrbach
  • Half-Corked Coasters Garage Sale … at Joyce Community Site, Joyce Depot Museum … mp 51 Handmade coasters! Large selection of styles and designs including Seahawks, WSU, UW, Olympic National Park, Port Angeles, Lavender … and many more to choose from!
  • Family Kitchen in Joyce … across from the Joyce General Store … mp 51/50 Mention this ad and get $1.00 off any entrée … Saturday, September 9 th only.
  • Crescent Grange Parking Lot Sale in Joyce mp 51/50 Furniture including tables, chairs, cabinets and recliner.  Also vacuum cleaners, light fixtures, pictures, books and movies. Proceeds help support youth scholarships and grange activities.
  • Big 5-Family Garage Sale … 92 Gossett Road (Whiskey Creek area) between mp 49-48 Antiques. Garden art. Furniture 1st-class and 2nd-hand items. Knick knacks. Lots of junktiques … and other neat stuff!
  • CLALLAM BAY/SEKIU COMMUNITY SITE … Clallam Bay Visitor Center mp 17/16 Music from 11am on into afternoon … Mary&Barney (Bluegrass) and Buddy Cloy (variety)
  • Strait Shots Espresso … 17295 Hwy 112, east entrance to Clallam Bay, between mp 18/17 The “Only Drive Thru Espresso” on beautiful Strait of Juan de Fuca Scenic Byway 112. Now serving Burgers, Hot Dogs, Chili Dogs.  $1 off any drink or meal with mention of the “Great Strait Sale!” Huge moving sale and other sales at this location as well!
  • Unique Junque … 16795 Hwy 112, next to Sunsets West Co-op, between mp 17/16 “Fun Days Fireworks” rummage sale! “Goodities and Oddities” too numerous to mention!
  • Sunsets West Co-Op … 16795 Hwy 112 … in “downtown” Clallam Bay between mp 17/16 Mention the Great Strait Sale and get $1 off a $4 "soup of the day".  We have ice cream and fun local goodies. Fresh local produce and a fine place to rest during your day of treasure hunting. See you at the sale.
  • Lions Club and others … 5th and Bogachiel in Clallam Bay mp 17/16 Lots of miscellaneous … and furniture, too … at old Fire Hall next to Lions Club. Check us out, could be some good finds for the right person in this big sale … even “GUY” stuff!
  • Three Sisters of Clallam … 16590 Hwy 112 in Clallam Bay mp 17-16 Big green building in Clallam Bay … lots of great buys and bargains!
  • Collectibles and More … 16732 Hwy 112 (across from Visitor Center) … mp 17/16 Collectibles: pottery, china, costume jewelry. Gently used and new clothing. Prom dresses. Household items. 60’s playpen. Lots of items (more than just a garage sale).
  • Breakwater Inn … Middle Point between Clallam Bay and Sekiu on Hwy 112 … mp 16/15 Breakfast ~ Lunch ~ Dinner. “Home of the Breakwater Sandwich” … 5% off meal with mention of the “Great Strait Sale” … Saturday only.
  • NEAH BAY COMMUNITY SITE … Village Market (by Washburn’s store) in Neah Bay Ask here for information about and location of individual sales in the community.
This event sponsored by the Juan de Fuca Scenic Byway Association, a non-profit org.  P.O. Box 188, Joyce, WA 98343 www.highway112.org  Contact: sandrabalch@olypen.com

Spend the night to enjoy the area: Take note of the Vietnam War Veteran’s and Korean War Veteran’s Memorial Highway designations and visit the Neah Bay Veteran’s Park Visit the Depot Museum in Joyce and the Makah Museum in Neah Bay Visit the Clallam County Parks at Clallam Bay, Pillar Point, Freshwater Bay and Salt Creek Recreation Area

Have fun. Drive Carefully. And, find good treasures along the Scenic Byway to go with the memories of our beautiful Strait of Juan de Fuca and surrounding landscape.

Thirteen Special Places

Get ready to overload your schedule with 10 + 3 special places on the Olympic Peninsula. There have been several lists compiled over the last few weeks, all with gorgeous photos and travel hints for the peninsula. Let's start with ExOfficio's  10 Totally Amazing Places to See on the Northern Olympic Peninsula. This list has amazing photos, as well as short descriptions of some of our favorite places.
Dungeness Lighthouse

Dungeness Lighthouse

We totally agree that the places on ExOfficio's list shouldn't be missed, but we think there are a couple missed opportunities to get into the flavor, history and fun. Dungeness Spit is mentioned #1 in ExOfficio's list and we are glad it made the list.  Dungeness Spit is especially precious. It's the longest natural sand spit in the USA. The 5.5-mile walk out to the New Dungeness Lighthouse is a test of endurance, since the walk is totally on sand.  You can sign up to be a lighthouse keeper for a week. Lots of responsibility, but a once-in-a-lifetime experience, or as the lighthouse keepers website says, Stay a Week...Memories for a Lifetime!
SR112 Joyce Museum

Joyce Museum

Joyce Museum and Joyce General Store count as one stop.  Summer hours for the museum are Thursday - Monday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Try to go when Margaret is there. She is the all-knowing docent of wisdom when it comes to the area. The log building, built in 1914, was once the train depot. Now it houses historic photographs, newspapers and examples of the days gone by.  Lots of artifacts and info about the recent Elwha River dam removal project is housed here. Take a reality step back in time when you enter the General Store. It's still got its brass mail boxes and absolutely everything you could possibly need - from motor oil to Wesson oil, from brushes to clean mushrooms to brushes to paint the house. Plus they have bumper stickers that say, "I ♥ Joyce", a definite memento for anyone you know named "Joyce".
John's Beachcombing Museum

John's Beachcombing Museum

John's Beachcombing Museum. A new must-do on the peninsula - near Forks. Here are some comments from visitors to this unique collection:
  • "Some very cool and very unusual stuff in there!"
  • "This place is amazing!!! I am an environmental science teacher and I learned an amazing amount of information about what washes up on our shores. Thanks John for a great and informational time."
  • "Absolutely loved our trip through John's museum. It was great listening to John's stories and the kids were totally engaged from the drive in until we drove away... Thanks John, this is a must see and we will be back." Admission to tour the museum is $5. Prepare to spend some time there! It's open 10 a.m.-5 p.m., or for group tours by appointment, for more information or questions call 360-640-0320.    

6 Travel Tips for this Spring

Here are six travel tips from a native Olympic Peninsula-ite, who thinks that winter and spring are special times to enjoy the outdoors here. Yes, of course, it can rain, but good gear will negate any reasons to not get out there to enjoy the lush greens and fresh air. You can find exquisite glimpses of nature that only happen at this time of year. There is a quiet solitude on most trails and the beaches entertain the changing weather. Late winter, early spring are good times to come visit. Whether you storm watch or shred the ski slopes, you'll find yourself renewed.
Marymere Falls near Lake Crescent in Winter

Marymere Falls near Lake Crescent in Winter

  1. TRAVEL TIP #1.  Do some research before you come. If you aren't one to make reservations ahead, at least check to see if there are activities that may limit hotel availability so you will be prepared. Be sure places you want to go are open and accessible on the days you plan to come. For example, at this time, the Hurricane Ridge Road is open Friday - Sunday. And it depends on the weather. Have a back up plan to find snow if the 'Ridge road is closed and that's your destination. Don't over plan. Give yourself time to enjoy being here. The Olympic Peninsula Travel Planner can help with ideas. OlympicPeninsula.org. PS. If you are bringing your dog, be sure check out the Dog-Friendly Map info from another blog.
  2. TRAVEL TIP #2. Plan your visit by drive times, not by miles. Drive times and distance don't always make sense. For example, if you are planning to drive directly to Neah Bay from Seattle it is only 154 miles, but it takes about 4-1/4 hours to get there. Magnificent scenery along the way, but no freeways. From Port Angeles to Forks, it is 56 miles and takes about 1-1/4 hours. These times are dependent on traffic and weather conditions. Give yourself plenty of time to enjoy the journey. Please obey the speed limit. There are multiple law enforcement agencies that will be watching!
  3. TRAVEL TIP #3. Pack for wearing layers and bring some rain gear. That's an all-season recommendation for the Olympic Peninsula. You can drive from a sunny Blue Hole in Sequim to the damp, wet rain forest. Some tennis shoes are good for hiking on slick boardwalks and sturdy hiking boots are good for trails if they are muddy. I've seen flip-flops on the beach in the winter and wondered if the people hadn't packed correctly, if they were trying to be one with the Pacific Ocean, or if they were just teenagers. I'm pretty sure their feet were cold no matter their reasons!
  4. TRAVEL TIP #4. Budget accordingly. Ferry (if you take one), gas, food, lodging, park permits, attraction fees and souvenirs. The Olympic Peninsula is abundant with things to do for free and low cost. Check out a previous blog for some free suggestions.
  5. TRAVEL TIP #5. Check out what the locals are doing. The communities around the peninsula are little jewels to explore. Take a look at the local papers, or bulletin boards at grocery stores or shop windows. Join the people who live here to see what they support in their communities. You can find everything from gem shows, to yoga retreats, to baking classes, to fly tying workshops, to "you-name-it" gatherings, to great local theater.
  6. TRAVEL TIP #6. Be realistic. I guess this is the biggest tip - to be realistic. Have an idea what you'd like to do, but remember all the variables. Weather, distance being the two main ones. Don't try to do too much. Come and visit multiple times. Enjoy what you can do while you are here. Maybe one trip is only to go to Sol Duc Hot Springs and see one waterfall there. Maybe the next time you'll go to the beach and stay, checking out a couple nearby beaches. The next time, maybe you will only camp at the Hoh Rainforest and do the hikes from the campground and take a raft trip down the river. You couldn't do all of those itineraries in one weekend. Well, I guess you could, but you'd need some R&R when you got home!
Enjoy your visit. Relax, play, and let the nature of the Olympic Peninsula soak into you.

Traveling this Fall? Trip #32

Traveling around the Olympic Peninsula in the fall can be sublime. The days are usually warm, evenings cool and mornings have that crisp, clean warmth. Here's a quick 3-day itinerary to see the best of the best. Day One. Starting in Seattle or Tacoma. Be ready for a busy day.  Enjoy the splendor of the
Hurricane Hill Hike

Hurricane Hill Hike

Elk in the Dosewallips River

Elk in the Dosewallips River

leaves changing color along Hood Canal. Grab a bite to eat at one of the several places with local seafood. Check out the Olympic Peninsula Culinary Loop for suggestions. You'll probably see bald eagles and herons, and perhaps a herd of Roosevelt elk. If you pack a lunch, stop at Triton Cove State Park. Continue on Hwy. 101 North to Port Angeles. From

there it's about 45 minutes to the top of Hurricane Ridge. Hopefully, there will be new snow on the mountain range. Stunning hike to Hurricane Hill! You can see the San Juan Islands, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, and the interior of the Olympic Mountains. Overnight in Port Angeles or the surrounding area.
Fall at Lake Crescent

Fall at Lake Crescent

Day Two. Heading west on Hwy 101. Enjoy the beauty of Lake Crescent. Take a walk through the woods to Marymere Falls, one of the falls on the Olympic Peninsula Waterfall Trail. The trailhead can be found turning off Hwy 101 with the signs to Lake Crescent Lodge. The lodge is open until January 1, then closes for the season. Continue around the lake to Hwy 113, the to Hwy112 West. Hwy 112 is one of the newer Scenic Byways in our state. At this time of year the leaves along this route, with the Strait of Juan de Fuca sparkling water to the north, is one of the favorite drives. Scenic it is! Head to Neah Bay and Cape Flattery, the most NW tip of the contiguous US. There is a short hike, mostly on boardwalk to the overlook to Tatoosh Island. You'll often see whales and an array of marine animals and shore birds. Make a stop at the Makah Museum. World-class exhibits you won't soon forget. Either stay along Hwy 112 or wander into Forks or La Push on the Quileute Nation for the night.
Olympic Peninsula Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Day Three. Check out the Visitor Center in Forks, Land of Twilight. You'll be amazed at the map with pins representing visitors' homelands. There's John's Beach Combing Museum in Forks. Take a look at what washes up on our shores. Traveling south on Hwy 101, make a turn into the Hoh Rain Forest. Walk the Hall of Mosses for that other-worldly experience of hiking through canopies of drippy moss. Catch the Ranger-led walk if you can. Back to Hwy 101 and a stop at Ruby Beach. One of our favorites. Continuing south, Kalaloch Lodge has dining and accommodations right above the beach.  Or further down Hwy 101, you'll find Lake Quinault with many types of lodging and dining. Interesting fact about Lake Quinault. The National Park owns some of the property around the lake. The Olympic National Forest owns part of the land and the Quinault Nation has jurisdiction over the water. The morning of the fourth day, head back to Seattle/Tacoma/Portland/Olympia. It's closest to keep going on 101, making almost the entire loop. Olympic Peninsula Map

Finding Totem Poles on the OP

A Few Totems Around the Olympic Peninsula
Sequim Totem Pole

Sequim Totem Pole

After a meeting in Sequim we stopped to look at the new totem pole installed at the site of the new City of Sequim offices. The totem is the starring highlight of the plaza outside the building. Stop to take a look (and some photos!) on your way through Sequim. The totem represents the sun always shining in Sequim. We know that's true! The legend this pole represents can be found at this link. There is also a geological reason the sun shines a lot in Sequim; and that is because of the rain shadow created by the Olympic Mountains. As weather systems come ashore along the Pacific Coast, the mountains slow the systems down where a majority of rain gets deposited on the western slopes, creating the famous, lush, mossy rainforests. For a description about the rain shadow, Wikipedia does a pretty good job:
Rain Shadow Effect

Rain Shadow Effect

The Dungeness Valley around SequimWashington lies in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains. The area averages 10–15 inches of rain per year, less than half of the amount received in nearby Port Angeles and approximately 10% of that which falls in Forks on the western side of the mountains. To a lesser extent, this rain shadow extends to other parts of the eastern Olympic Peninsula, Whidbey Island, and parts of the San Juan Islands and southeastern Vancouver Island around Victoria, British Columbia.
Port Ludlow Totem Pole

Port Ludlow Totem Pole

After spending some time examining the Sequim totem, I got to thinking about other totem poles and carvings on the Olympic Peninsula.  Port Ludlow did a re-dedication last July 4th of their 40-foot refurbished totem pole that sits on Burner Point. It was originally carved from a 720-year-old western red cedar that grew near the Hoh Rain Forest and was blown down in the 1993 windstorm. If you get to stop to see this totem, you’ll find places to go kayaking, good food and beverages, and a picture-worthy marina. There are often bald eagles keeping an eye on things around the area. If you have time, Ludlow Falls is not far. OlympicPeninsulaWaterfallTrail.com  
Artists Pavilion, Neah Bay

Artists Pavilion, Neah Bay

Jamestown S'Klallam Tribal Center

Jamestown S'Klallam Tribal Center

PA totem poles

Port Angeles Totem Poles

Another stop on Hwy 101 is in Blyn at the Tribal Center for the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, the Longhouse Market and 7 Cedars Casino. There are several totems at these properties along the edge of Discovery Bay. A stop at the House of Myth (the totem carving shed) at the Tribal Center is a special treat if the doors are open. Stick your head in to watch! They are actively carving totem poles by traditional methods and tools. It smells so good with cedar essence in the air.

Port Angeles waterfront has two totem poles to stop and visit while you pick up additional information you may need from the Visitor Center on Railroad Avenue. One represents our glorious past, our great present and the future for all of us. While you are there you might want to walk out the pier for a view back across the city with the Olympic Mountains in the background.
Carved figures at the Makah Cultural & Resource Center

Carved figures at the Makah Cultural & Resource Center

Part of the Olympic Discovery Trail goes in front of the Visitor Center. This rails-to-trails project along the old railroad line traverses peninsula lowlands, bordered on the south by the Olympic Mountains and on the north by the Strait of Juan de Fuca. One end point is the Victorian seaport of Port Townsend, the other is La Push on the Pacific Ocean. When complete, the trail will be a 130-mile-long, wide, paved path designed for multiple uses: bicyclists, hikers, and disabled users, with a 4’ shoulder for equestrians where appropriate. There are several totem poles in Forks and some lovely carvings in La Push. If you’re in Neah Bay, you’ll see two figures by the Makah Cultural & Resource Center and Museum. Be sure to stop by the new Artist's Center on Hobuck Road, Neah Bay.  
Olympic Peninsula Whale Tales & Whale Tails A local whale enthusiast recently reawakened our fascination with whales by explaining just how amazing the OP is for whale watching. It’s truly the best spot in the northwest to watch a variety of whales. Seeing these wondrous and mysterious creatures from shore or boat is a memorable, bucket-worthy experience with bragging rights!
polly debari gray whale cape flattery

Gray Whale off Cape Flattery

Gray whales are our day-by-day whale on the shores along the Strait and outer coast. They hug the coastline all the way from Mexico on their way north. A genetically distinct band will peel off from the main route heading to Alaska and turn right into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Here, they feed and forage in the near shore kelp beds and along the sandy bottom during the summer season, or if they are not calving, perhaps all year.  
220px-Humpback_Whale,_blowholes

Humpback Whale

Humpback whales spend the winter months near Hawaii (who doesn’t like that idea?) where they have their young and then head for the Pacific Northwest and northern waters. Again, a distinct group stays near the outer coast of the Olympic Peninsula and in the Strait of Juan de Fuca all summer and into the fall. We don’t see Humpbacks as often from shore because they need deeper water where small fish and krill are found.

A breaching orca. Photo courtesy of NOAA Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

And then there are the Orcas, of which we have a lot of information. There are three resident pods in Puget Sound. The J, K and L pods are individually named and have generated lots of data, and several lines of plush toys adored by children of all ages. These resident orcas are social and use echo location and sound to locate their favorite food – salmon! One of our favorite foods, too! In addition, transient orcas come through the region in smaller family groups. These silent hunters seek seals for their meals
Minke Whale

Minke Whale

The minke whales are a very fast, smaller whale that not much is known about – yet. We do know that they breathe three to five times at short intervals before they “deep dive” for two to 20 minutes. The deep dives are preceded by a pronounced arching of the whales’ backs. Maximum swimming speed is estimated at about 24 miles per hour.
Whale Trail Kiosk at Freshwater Bay

Whale Trail Kiosk at Freshwater Bay

The Olympic Peninsula is a key player in The Whale Trail, (whaletrail.org) with 15 sites designated as most likely to view whales from shore. NOAA’s Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (olympiccoast.noaa.gov) includes 2400 square nautical miles and 135 miles of wilderness coastline off the Pacific Coast.  Here, the whales can be seen migrating freely in protected waters. The Makahs are an ancient whaling society, as are most coastal tribes. The Makah Cultural and Resource Center in Neah Bay (makah.com) has excellent interpretations of the importance of the whale to their culture. The Quileute People host an annual Welcoming the Whales Ceremony.  The exact date fluctuates so  plan on visiting in late March to early April for this event.  It was held on April 11 in 2014. (quileutenation.org) READY TO GO?
  • Take a whale watching charter into the San Juan Islands from Port Townsend to see the resident orcas all summer, with trips to see gray whales and the visiting orcas, too. (pugetsoundexpress.com).
  • In the spring, the migration is fun to watch off the coast, particularly at LaPush where the grays tarry and feed with their young.
  • Cape Flattery is a hot spot to watch the grays, and other sea mammals.
  • In August 2014, Port Angeles will welcome an established whale watching company offering daily tours to see humpback whales in the Strait.  Visit pawhalewatch.com to find out more about Port Angeles Whale Watching.
  • It is not unusual to see whales and sea mammals from the Coho Ferry between Port Angeles and Victoria, Canada. (cohoferry.com)
Kinetic 2010 Sally the Map Lady

Kinetic Skulpture Race in Port Townsend

web whale bone

Whale vertebrae sculpture, Port Angeles

Oh, and you can look for representation of whales on land or made by hand, too. The OP has many cultural assets in public art celebrating our affection for whales! Embrace, absorb and share the Olympic Peninsula Whale experience!

The Northwest Coast

The northwest coast of the Olympic Peninsula, from the beaches of Clallam Bay along Highway 112 to the culturally rich Makah Indian Reservation and down to the rugged beauty of Shi Shi Beach and Lake Ozette, offers a wide variety of unique experiences. Something for everyone isn't just a cliche here. It's the simple truth.
beaches

Shi Shi Beach

For those who love the water, an unforgettable adventure awaits at Clallam Bay and along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. A stay in the fishing village of Sekiu, right on the bay, is a chance to slow down while walking the docks and breathe in the sea air. For generations, anglers have launched their boats into the protected bay in search of record-breaking salmon and halibut. To the north, across the Strait are spectacular views of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. Clallam Bay offers great family adventures such as hiking, camping, birding, beachcombing, diving, kayaking, wildlife watching and just about any outdoor fun that does require waiting in line or at stoplights.
Northwest Coast

Road to Sekiu by Randall Hodges

A drive up Highway 112 towards Neah Bay, home of the Makah tribe and the point of Cape Flattery, offers a chance to take in the views of the Strait. Motorcyclists especially appreciate the 249 curves of the road along the coast to Neah Bay. By the late 1700s, the Native American populations of Makahs and Ozettes numbered over 200 in villages near Neah Bay and Lake Ozette. Europeans first visited the area in the 16th century and later established settlements along the coast. Today, the outstanding exhibits at the Makah Cultural and Research Center in Neah Bay offer a look at the early life of the Makahs. The boardwalk trail to Cape Flattery offers breathtaking vistas with four observation decks where one can see Tatoosh and Vancouver Islands, sea life, and ship traffic. A two mile hike on the southern end of the Makah Reservation leads to pristine Shi Shi Beach. Only accessible by foot, Shi Shi has a special kind of natural setting that attracts those hikers looking to slow down, or perhaps even go surfing. Down the Hoko-Ozette road to the south along the Pacific Ocean lies Lake Ozette. First settled in the 1800s by Scandinavian immigrants, the area around Lake Ozette was included in the Olympic Forest Reserve. At over nine square miles, Lake Ozette is the largest natural lake in the state of Washington. The Ozette Triangle is a popular 9.4 mile loop from the recently uncovered ancient village of Ozette at the northern tip of the lake, along the cedar-planked boardwalk through wild forests and meadows to Cape Alava, down the primitive beach to Sand Point, and back another cedar-planked trail to Ozette.

12 Things to do before you’re 12 on Olympic Peninsula- Part 2

Experience a Scenic Byway and Local Wildlife on the Way to the End of the Continent, and Visit a Native American Longhouse.  Olympic Peninsula whale trail Watch for whales on the Whale Trail. One of the nation's newest National Scenic Byways, Highway 112 follows the shoreline of a glacial fjord that connects Puget Sound to the Pacific Ocean, separating the Olympic Peninsula from Vancouver Island, British Columbia. This dramatic stretch of coastline with rugged cliffs and forests reaches farther into the cold waters of the North Pacific than any other mainland point in the lower 48 states. Eagles, otters and gray whales are common sights, depending on the time of year. The Whale Trail has several stops along the Byway: Cape Flattery at Neah Bay, Sekiu Overlook, and Shipwreck Point. Olympic Peninsula MakahAt the end of the highway is Neah Bay where the world famous Makah Cultural and Research Center is located.  Many of the items in the museum are from the "Ozette Dig," which yielded Makah artifacts from a village partially buried in a mudslide in the 1500s. The Part #2.  Ozette archeological collection is the largest pre-contact Northwest Coast Indian collection in the country. Whaling, sealing and fishing gear, basketry and replicas of a 60-foot cedar longhouse and oceangoing canoes are displayed. The center also houses the Makah language program, working to preserve and teach Makah language and culture. Take a walk to Cape Flattery (the most northwest tip of the continental US) for a view of Tatoosh Island and lighthouse. 3. Scenic Byway: http://www.byways.org/explore/byways/13740/ 4. Neah Bay: http://neahbaychamberofcommerce.com/ 5. Makah Nation: http://www.makah.com/ 6. Makah Museum: http://www.makah.com/exhibits.html 7. Cape Flattery: http://www.northolympic.com/capeflatterytrail/